Skip to main content
ad info

 
CNN.com AllPolitics
  Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Free E-mail | Feedback  
 

Search


Search tips
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Bush unveiling religious-based charity plan

Bush and family attend largely black church

Bush appears to make encouraging first impression

Bush Cabinet will meet over California power crisis

Former first lady says Reagans repaid Bel Air home with interest

Lockhart defends Clintons as GOP criticizes gifts, pardons, pranks

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Indian PM witnesses quake devastation

EU considers tighter BSE controls

Alpine tunnel tops summit agenda

Bill Gates to address Davos

(MORE)

 MARKETS    1613 GMT, 12/28
5217.4
-25.00
5160.1
+42.97
4624.58
+33.42

 
SPORTS

(MORE)

 All Scoreboards
WEATHER
European Forecast

 Or choose another Region:
EUROPE

WORLD

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

  IN OTHER NEWS

U.S.

HEALTH

TRAVEL



(MORE HEADLINES)
EDITIONS:
CNN.com U.S.:
*

LOCAL LANGUAGES:


MULTIMEDIA:

CNN WEB SITES:

CNN NETWORKS:
CNN International

TIME INC. SITES:

SITE INFO:

WEB SERVICES:

Fact check: Statisticians dispute Gore's math on Miami-Dade hand counts

 VIDEO
Listen to the Supreme Court hearing (with CNN Radio commentary on who is speaking) (December 1)

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3
Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6
(QuickTime, Real or Windows Media)

Watch all up-to-the-minute video of Election 2000
 
  TRANSCRIPTS
 
  ALSO
 
  INTERACTIVE
 
  IN-DEPTH
 
  RELATED SITES
 

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- What are the odds that a manual recount of ballots in Florida's Miami-Dade County would have put Vice President Al Gore over the top in the state's final presidential tally? Longer than Gore himself figures, according to separate studies conducted by economists at two universities.

Gore's arithmetic was simple: Canvassers counted about one-fifth of the precincts in Miami-Dade County before calling it quits. The partial recount produced a 157-vote gain for Gore that wasn't included in the state's certified total.

Projecting that the remaining precincts would have yielded an equal gain of votes for the Democratic nominee, his legal team argued that county's decision to halt manual recounts cost their candidate a net gain of 757 votes.

But the experts disagree. Bruce Hansen, a statistician at the University of Wisconsin, contends that a 600-vote gain for Gore in the remaining precincts is a highly unlikely scenario.

"Those projections were unreasonable. I don't think any statistician allied with the Gore team or not would have, signed onto that," he said.

Professor Hansen's own study of the Miami-Dade vote examined the polling data precinct by precinct, and concluded that Gore would gain as many as 179 additional votes and as few as 15 if the hand recount was completed.

Hansen says the partial manual recount the county had completed focused on precincts with the strongest Democratic support, while those remaining would have favored Gore less.

Yet another university study estimates a 10-1 chance that Gore would actually lose votes in the remaining Miami-Dade precincts. Peyton Young, an economist at Johns Hopkins University, estimates that Gore could lose as many as 62 votes in the remaining precincts or gain as many 283 votes.

And that's based on very sophisticated methods -- choosing possible variables by chance and projecting each precinct's possible outcomes over and over again.

"About 1,000 times we ran this so-called 'Monte Carlo' simulation, trying to estimate how many votes net for Gore or Bush you would get out of a manual recount," says Young.

If those projections are correct, it means Gore would still need to gain votes in other counties even if Miami-Dade conducts a full hand count. The vice president is asking the courts to add 188 votes gained in the Palm Beach County manual recount, and another 52 votes netted for him after a machine recount in Nassau County. Both figures were excluded from Florida's certified total.

But even if Gore gains all those votes along with a full manual recount in Miami-Dade, Young estimates that odds of overtaking Bush at about 3-1.


MORE STORIES:

Friday, December 1, 2000

ARCHIVES

 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.