Skip to main content
ad info

 
CNN.com Allpoliticsallpolitics.comwith TIME
CNN.com EUROPE:
  Editions|myCNN|Video|Audio|News Brief|Free E-mail|Feedback  
 

Search


Search tips
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Bush unveiling religious-based charity plan

Bush and family attend largely black church

Bush appears to make encouraging first impression

Bush Cabinet will meet over California power crisis

Former first lady says Reagans repaid Bel Air home with interest

Lockhart defends Clintons as GOP criticizes gifts, pardons, pranks

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Indian PM witnesses quake devastation

EU considers tighter BSE controls

Alpine tunnel tops summit agenda

Bill Gates to address Davos

(MORE)

 MARKETS    1613 GMT, 12/28
5217.4
-25.00
5160.1
+42.97
4624.58
+33.42

 
SPORTS

(MORE)

 All Scoreboards
WEATHER
European Forecast

 Or choose another Region:
EUROPE

WORLD

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

  IN OTHER NEWS

U.S.

HEALTH

TRAVEL



(MORE HEADLINES)
EDITIONS:
CNN.com U.S.:
*

LOCAL LANGUAGES:


MULTIMEDIA:

CNN WEB SITES:

CNN NETWORKS:
CNN International

TIME INC. SITES:

SITE INFO:

WEB SERVICES:

Florida's African-American voters angry over Bush win

MIAMI, Florida (CNN) -- Fred McLendon runs an auto customizing business near Miami. He says the presidential election was a fiasco in which African Americans were disenfranchised.

"It was like you were spitting in my face, and that bothers me more than anything," he says.

McLendon
Fred McLendon: "No one considers Bush their president."  

He is most angry about what he calls "the arrogance" of Republicans who fought against manual recounts -- and in his view, cost President-elect George W. Bush support in the African-American community.

"No one considers Bush their president. We really don't," he continues. "As far as we're concerned, we have four years of not having a president."

From the calls she's been getting, Rep. Carrie Meek, a Florida Democrat, is convinced McLendon's views are widespread among African-Americans.

"They are angry, they are disappointed, they are disgusted, and they feel cheated," she said.

On Election Day, an estimated 90 percent of African-Americans voted for Al Gore. Many are convinced that if all votes were counted, he would have won.

They also allege that some African-Americans faced discrimination at the polls, and that an inordinate number of faulty voting machines were placed in poor communities.

"People in my community are calling the Florida situation, they are calling Florida the new Selma," says Meek.

Willie Sims, director of Miami-Dade County's Black Affairs Advisory Board says he, too, has been swamped by calls from angry African-American voters. And he agrees with them.

"America as the champion of democracy ought to be dressed in black on January 20th, when they inaugurate a president who clearly did not win," he told CNN.

Rev. Mack King Carter runs the Mount Olive Baptist Church in Fort Lauderdale, which sponsors a youth motivational group. He, and many other African-Americans say they will organize to correct problems at the polls.

"We're going to transfer our pain into productivity, because there is still room for victory. President-elect Bush will only be in office for four years, and his brother Jeb has two more," he predicted, referring to Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.


MORE STORIES:

Friday, December 15, 2000

ARCHIVES

 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.