ad info

 
CNN.com    asianow > south TimeAsia
myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Free E-mail | Feedback  

 

 Search
 
 

 
ASIANOW
TOP STORIES

Faith, madness, magic mix at sacred Hindu festival

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Tanker spills remaining fuel near Galapagos as captain detained

Final two Texas fugitives make first court appearance

Gore accepts visiting professor post at Columbia

Lott calls Justice Department 'cesspool,' Ashcroft foes 'extremists'

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*   ASIA NOW
   east asia
   southeast asia
   south asia
   central asia
   australasia
  TIME ASIA
  ASIAWEEK
  BUSINESS
  SPORTS
  ENTERTAINMENT
  ASIA WEATHER
  TRAVEL
 MULTIMEDIA:
 E-MAIL:
 
 DISCUSSION:
  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 FASTER ACCESS:
 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 SITE INFO:
 WEB SERVICES:

from:
Time.com

Pakistan shooting clouds Clinton's visit

March 10, 2000
Web posted at: 10:48 PM HKT (1448 GMT)

Pakistan isn't exactly making it easy for President Clinton. Only four days after the White House announced it would include a brief stop in Pakistan in the course of the President's visit to India and Bangladesh, one of ousted prime minister Nawaz Sharif's lawyers, Iqbal Raad, was shot dead in broad daylight by unknown gunmen. Nawaz is being tried on charges of kidnapping and attempted murder, for allegedly attempting to prevent a plane carrying current military leader Gen. Parvez Musharraf from landing -- the event that triggered last year's coup. The Friday shooting came a day after Raad had begun to present Nawaz's defense, arguing that the coup plot against him originated after he met with President Clinton last June and agreed to withdraw Pakistani forces who had crossed into Indian territory at Kargil in the disputed territory of Kashmir. Pakistan's military was widely reported to have fiercely opposed the decision to retreat.

Although the Clinton administration had considered staying away from Pakistan in light of the coup and unhappiness in Washington over Islamabad's efforts in the fight against terrorism, the president elected to go in the belief that a personal relationship with General Musharraf could be critical to resolving future crises in an unstable region -- as his personal relationship with Nawaz had helped end the Kargil standoff. The fact that President Clinton's old friend Nawaz is now saying General Musharraf launched his coup in retaliation for the Pakistani premier's doing Washington's bidding -- and the assassination of his lawyer in mid-argument -- may slow the chemistry between the U.S. president and the Pakistani strongman.

Copyright © 2000 Time Inc.

ASIANOW

 Search


Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.