Skip to main content
ad info

 
CNN.com
  healthAIDS Aging Alternative Medicine Cancer Children Diet & Fitness Men Women
CNN.com EUROPE:
  Editions|myCNN|Video|Audio|News Brief|Free E-mail|Feedback  
 

Search


Search tips
HEALTH
TOP STORIES

New treatments hold out hope for breast cancer patients

Parents to appeal order that Florida woman can die

Diabetic treatment may trigger lethal brain swelling

Gulf War illness answer eludes doctors

New gay AIDS infections rise sharply in San Francisco

Study shows rats dream about running mazes

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

India quake toll rising

Plea to delay climate talks

Global BSE warning issued

Cuba explains Czech arrests

(MORE)

 MARKETS    1613 GMT, 12/28
5217.4
-25.00
5160.1
+42.97
4624.58
+33.42

 
SPORTS

(MORE)

 All Scoreboards
WEATHER
European Forecast

 Or choose another Region:
EUROPE

WORLD

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

  IN OTHER NEWS

U.S.

TRAVEL



(MORE HEADLINES)
EDITIONS:
CNN.com U.S.:
*

LOCAL LANGUAGES:


MULTIMEDIA:

CNN WEB SITES:

CNN NETWORKS:
CNN International

TIME INC. SITES:

SITE INFO:

WEB SERVICES:

Tobacco settlement dollars spent on snuffing out underage smoking

cigarette ads
Students in anti-smoking programs try to find the message in cigarette advertising  

July 26, 2000
Web posted at: 1:26 a.m. EDT (0526 GMT)

MIAMI (CNN) -- Even as America's five biggest tobacco companies appeal a record-setting verdict in Florida, tobacco money funds anti-smoking programs in several states.

The $6 billion earmarked for programs that teach children about the health hazards of lighting up comes from the $254 billion nationwide tobacco settlement.

One instructor said that understanding advertising at an early age is key to preventing kids from smoking.

"Tobacco marketing is targeted to kids your age, between 12 and 15. That's when they want to get you," Hot Tips Program instructor Tim Curtin warned one class in Broward County, Florida. "It just takes one cigarette -- the first one -- to begin the addictive behaviors."

Curtin believes he needs to get the message out to even younger students.

"Like any substance use or abuse, the younger we can target the audience, the more informed and educated they will be when they first come across that temptation, curiosity," he said.

During Florida's landmark class action lawsuit, tobacco executives repeatedly told jurors they are not using advertising to rope in young people.

"We do not want kids to smoke. We do not go after kids. We do not go after non-smokers," R.J. Reynolds CEO Andrew Schindler testified on June 19.

Anti-smoking advocates say it's not just a matter of advertising.

"It's a matter of permeating the culture with your message and your images," said Danny McGoldrick of the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. "And so they do this through advertising and being in every store you ever walk into."

 VIDEO
CNN's Susan Candiotti shows an anti-smoking campaign funded by the nationwide tobacco lawsuit settlement

Play video
(QuickTime, Real or Windows Media)
 

Youngsters in Curtin's program are taught to find the hidden messages of cigarette ads.

"If you smoke these cigarettes, you'll be pretty and slim," one student said after studying an ad.

Curtin affirmed the student's assessment, "The message being, if you smoke these cigarettes, you'll be long and slender, too."

His message has an impact on some Miami youngsters in the program.

"Smoking can kill you," said 7th grader Sean Gray.



RELATED STORIES:
Tobacco moves landmark smokers' case to federal court
July 24, 2000
Why the Big Tobacco verdict may go up in smoke
July 19, 2000
Lawyers back in court in Florida smoking trial
July 17, 2000

RELATED SITES:
Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids
Philip Morris Website
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Brown & Williamson
Lorillard Tobacco Company
Liggett Group Inc.


Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.
 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.