ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
* TECHNOLOGY
   computing
   personal technology
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
 NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

COMPUTING

From...
Computerworld

Film studios file suit against accused DVD hackers

Image

January 18, 2000
Web posted at: 2:19 p.m. EST (1919 GMT)

by Terho Uimonen

(IDG) -- Eight major motion picture companies late last week filed injunction complaints in U.S. Federal Court against three alleged hackers to prevent them from publishing an unauthorized DVD (digital versatile disk) de-encryption program on their Web sites.

The complaints were filed in the Southern District of New York and the District of Connecticut on behalf of plaintiffs Universal Studios Inc., Paramount Pictures Corp., Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc., Tristar Pictures Inc., Columbia Pictures Industries Inc., Time Warner Entertainment Co., Disney Enterprises Inc. and Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp., according to a statement issued last Friday by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
IDG.net   IDG.net home page
  Activist defends DVD hack
  DVD vendors regroup on copy protection
  Flawed copyright protection puts new spin on DVD
  DVD encryption hacked

The film studios named two defendants in New York, Shawn Reimerdes and Eric Corley, also known as Emmanuel Goldstein, while Jeraimee Hughes is the sole defendant in the claim filed in Connecticut, the MPAA statement said.

The de-encryption software, called DeCSS, reportedly originates in Norway and was first published on the Web in October (see "DVD encryption hacked," link below).

DeCSS can be used to de-encrypt content, such as movies, on DVD disks protected by an encryption system called CSS (content scrambling system) that is used to prevent illegal copying of DVD disks.


RELATED STORIES:
Microsoft's Taiwan Web site hacked
January 10, 2000
Study: Encryption keys not safe on servers
January 10, 2000
CES showcases Internet everywhere
January 7, 2000
Feds leave doors open for hackers
December 22, 1999
Pioneer to launch DVD Audio players without waiting for copy protection
December 14, 1999
DVD-hack concerns delay audio products
December 2, 1999
Activist defends DVD hack
November 8, 1999

RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
DVD encryption hacked
(Computerworld)
Flawed copyright protection puts new spin on DVD
(Computerworld)
Disorder in the court over DVD
(The Industry Standard)
Activist defends DVD hack
(Computerworld)
DVD vendors regroup on copy protection
(PC World Online)
DVD hits the big time
(IDG.net)
Rewritable CDs go mainstream
(PC World Online)
Encryption plan proposed for digital video
(PC World Online)
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

RELATED SITES:
Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA)
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.
 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.