Skip to main content /US
CNN.com /US
SERVICES
CNN TV
EDITIONS


COMPLETE COVERAGE | FRONT LINES | AMERICA AT HOME | INTERACTIVES »

Bush touts House aviation security measure

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The House is set to vote next week on an airline security bill President Bush calls "the quickest, most effective way to increase aviation security" by strengthening standards for airport screeners, who will be under control of the federal government.

But the bill introduced by Rep. Don Young, R-Alaska, differs from a similar measure approved by the Senate October 11 because it does not require passenger and baggage screeners to be federal employees.

MORE STORIES
Bush signs antiterrorism bill into law 
 
Attack on America
 CNN.COM SPECIAL REPORT
 CNN NewsPass Video 
Agencies reportedly got hijack tips in 1998
 MORE STORIES
Intelligence intercept led to Buffalo suspects
Report cites warnings before 9/11
 EXTRA INFORMATION
Timeline: Who Knew What and When?
Interactive: Terror Investigation
Terror Warnings System
Most wanted terrorists
What looks suspicious?
In-Depth: America Remembers
In-Depth: Terror on Tape
In-Depth: How prepared is your city?
 RESOURCES
On the Scene: Barbara Starr: Al Qaeda hunt expands?
On the Scene: Peter Bergen: Getting al Qaeda to talk

"The Young bill allows the use of private contractors operating under tough federal standards on background checks with federal law enforcement at every gate," Bush said during his weekly radio address Saturday.

The Senate bill, he said, "is well-intended, (but) the best approach will be one that provides flexibility."

Both the House and Senate bills are based on recommendations Bush made last month -- including federal marshals on airplanes, increased cockpit security and hijack training for pilots -- but Bush said the Young bill more closely matches his proposals.

Bush also used his radio address to explain the need for the antiterrorism bill he signed Friday. The bill grants federal authorities expanded surveillance and intelligence-gathering power.

"For a long time, we have been working under laws written in the era of rotary telephones," he said.

The new law, which Bush said "recognizes the realities and dangers posed by the modern terrorist," was passed with broad bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate.



 
 
 
 



RELATED SITES:
See related sites about US
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

U.S. TOP STORIES:

 Search   

Back to the top