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Hyder: Anti-aircraft fire in Afghanistan

Hyder
Kamal Hyder  


(CNN) -- Journalist Kamal Hyder spoke with CNN from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan on Monday, shortly after word came that a second day of U.S.-led airstrikes had begun against targets in Afghanistan.

HYDER: We just spoke to [our sources in] Kandahar and they said [that] after the anti-aircraft fire over Kandahar they heard three or four loud explosions, and then there was a silence for a few minutes, and then the anti-aircraft artillery resumed again.

Radio Kabul went off the air, and when we contacted our contact in Kabul, he said, "Yes, we are under attack." Every time Radio Kabul goes off the air it is a precautionary measure that they are under attack, and this is exactly what happened yesterday.

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CNN: It's now nightfall; what kind of a day was it there?

HYDER: Today was quite normal. People were back in the markets. Many people, of course, took their families out of the city again. Most people are accustomed to heavy artillery duels.

So, it was normal, the city was normal. Shops and all were open. But most people decided to take their families out, even though they felt secure that their families would be safe and civilian targets would not be likely, they still didn't want to take any chances.

And last night most people decided to keep their families indoors, and some people even braved the anti-aircraft fire and the missiles and decided to leave the city.

CNN: Is this a place where there are likely to be bomb shelters, where people can go underground to find safety?

HYDER: No. It must be remembered that 23 years of war and mass population movement and impoverished economy, these people never prepared for war. There was a civil war, so they're not organized. They don't have bomb shelters or places where they can take their people.






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On The Scene

Hyder: Anti-aircraft fire in Afghanistan

Hyder
Kamal Hyder  


(CNN) -- Journalist Kamal Hyder spoke with CNN from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan on Monday, shortly after word came that a second day of U.S.-led airstrikes had begun against targets in Afghanistan.

Attack on America
 CNN.COM SPECIAL REPORT
 CNN NewsPass Video 
Agencies reportedly got hijack tips in 1998
 MORE STORIES
Intelligence intercept led to Buffalo suspects
Report cites warnings before 9/11
 EXTRA INFORMATION
Timeline: Who Knew What and When?
Interactive: Terror Investigation
Terror Warnings System
Most wanted terrorists
What looks suspicious?
In-Depth: America Remembers
In-Depth: Terror on Tape
In-Depth: How prepared is your city?
 RESOURCES
On the Scene: Barbara Starr: Al Qaeda hunt expands?
On the Scene: Peter Bergen: Getting al Qaeda to talk

HYDER: We just spoke to [our sources in] Kandahar and they said [that] after the anti-aircraft fire over Kandahar they heard three or four loud explosions, and then there was a silence for a few minutes, and then the anti-aircraft artillery resumed again.

Radio Kabul went off the air, and when we contacted our contact in Kabul, he said, "Yes, we are under attack." Every time Radio Kabul goes off the air it is a precautionary measure that they are under attack, and this is exactly what happened yesterday.

CNN: It's now nightfall; what kind of a day was it there?

HYDER: Today was quite normal. People were back in the markets. Many people, of course, took their families out of the city again. Most people are accustomed to heavy artillery duels.

So, it was normal, the city was normal. Shops and all were open. But most people decided to take their families out, even though they felt secure that their families would be safe and civilian targets would not be likely, they still didn't want to take any chances.

And last night most people decided to keep their families indoors, and some people even braved the anti-aircraft fire and the missiles and decided to leave the city.

CNN: Is this a place where there are likely to be bomb shelters, where people can go underground to find safety?

HYDER: No. It must be remembered that 23 years of war and mass population movement and impoverished economy, these people never prepared for war. There was a civil war, so they're not organized. They don't have bomb shelters or places where they can take their people.






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