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Elton to lose glasses for good

Sir Elton's glasses have become his trademark over the years
Sir Elton's glasses have become his trademark over the years

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LONDON, England -- British pop star Sir Elton John is to lose his trademark glasses and have corrective eye surgery instead.

The star, who owns around 4,000 pairs, said he was tired of never being able to find them.

He told a UK television interview on Tuesday that he planned to have laser eye surgery next year.

Recalling the first glasses he owned, Sir Elton, 55, said: "In those days you went to the opticians and you had two or three glasses to choose from -- tortoiseshell or the round ones John Lennon used to wear.

"But now you can get everything.

"In fact, I'm getting the operation soon. I'm going to have the laser operation in February."

He went on: "I'm so fed up with 'Where are they?' I can't see anything, so why wait?"

Sir Elton's outrageous spectacles are part of his image and he once admitted to having bought 20,000 pairs over the years.

They include glasses with windscreen wipers, flashing lights and sun visors, although these days they are a little less over the top.

There was even a West End comedy called "Elton John's Glasses," in which his beloved football team Watford lost the 1984 FA Cup Final when the goalkeeper was blinded by a flash of sunlight reflected on the star's specs.

The multi-millionaire singer, whose hits include "Candle in the Wind," "Rocket Man" and "I'm Still Standing," said he planned to auction off his soon-to-be redundant collection.



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