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Police hunt London bombers

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LONDON, England -- British officials have pledged to carry out an exhaustive investigation to bring the perpetrators of the London bombings to justice.

Prime Minister Tony Blair said there would be the "most intense police and security service action to make sure we bring those responsible to justice."

Earlier Thursday Deputy Police Chief Brian Paddick said there had been no arrests, adding that it was unclear whether suicide bombers were involved.

"Four devices we believe were involved in today's incidents," Paddick told a joint news conference in the city.

"The police service received no warning about these attacks," he said, noting that the authorities had also received no claims of responsibility.

"This clearly was a callous attack on purely innocent members of the public deliberately designed to kill and injure innocent members of the public.

"At the moment we do not know whether this was suicide bombers or simply packages left on the bus and in the Underground stations. It's too early to say.

"There is no indication that these were anything other than conventional explosives."

A previously unknown group calling itself the "Secret Organization group al Qaeda Organization in Europe" released a statement Thursday claiming responsibility for the subway and bus bombings in London earlier in the day. (Full story)

CNN could not confirm the authenticity of the statement, which was posted on a Web site connected to Islamic radicals.

Police said there was no specific intelligence before bombings, but officers in the capital had been on high alert anyway for several months, especially with G8 summit taking place this week in Scotland.

Addressing fears of further attacks, Paddick said buses and trains in the capital would be searched before bringing them back into service. He added there was no information there might be other explosive devices though.

Hundreds of London police officers involved in the security operation around the G8 summit in Scotland returned to the capital following the attacks.

About 1,500 officers had formed part of the 12,000-strong contingent of police, gathered from across the UK, to police the G8 summit of world leaders at Gleneagles.

In the rest of Britain, police at rail stations said they planned to talk to commuters who may have vital information to catch the terrorists.

A spokeswoman told the Press Association: "Teams of officers will be deployed to railway stations to interview passengers returning from London to assist in the collation of witness information."

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