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Mumbai mourns its '7/11' victims

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MUMBAI, India (CNN) -- The sprawling, bustling city of Mumbai stood still as millions of its residents observed two minutes of silence to mourn the victims of last week's deadly train attack.

Sirens wailed to commence the remembrance in Mumbai and other places across the country around the same time of day as Tuesday's well-coordinated evening rush-hour strike -- which killed 182 people and wounded hundreds.

People in Mumbai and throughout India quietly stood at attention on the streets, assembled in their homes and sat in ashrams, Hindu places of worship.

Some saluted, others lit candles, and many prayed as they contemplated the horror of the July 11 terror strike. Indian President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam was in Mumbai, India's financial capital formerly known as Bombay, to lead the two minutes of silence.

India's Anti-Terrorist Squad said that forensic reports have revealed that RDX, ammonium nitrate and fuel oil were used in making the seven bombs that exploded on Mumbai trains. RDX is one of the most powerful kinds of military explosives.

ATS chief K.P. Raghuvansi told reporters on Monday that the rarely-used combination of chemicals was confirmed in tests by the India's Forensic Science laboratory. He also said that timers were also found at the bomb sites.

Indian security official have still not officially named any group responsible for either attack.

Investigators in India are focusing on Pakistan-based Islamic terrorist group Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, which has denied responsibility for the Mumbai bombs.

No group has claimed responsibility for the blasts, and no arrests have been made. Also, police searching for clues in the case are still examining phone records from calls between Mumbai and the countries of Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Many Indian authorities believe Pakistan has not done enough to fight insurgents in Pakistan fighting India over the disputed territory of Kashmir, the major flash point in region.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh said last week that he has explained to Pakistan that "if the acts of terrorism are not controlled it will be exceedingly difficult for any government to carry forward what may be called normalization and peace process."

"Pakistan in 2004 had solemnly given an assurance that Pakistani territory will not be used to promote, encourage, train and abet terrorist elements directed against India. That assurance has to be fulfilled before the peace process or other processes can make progress," Singh said on Friday.

The cancellation of bilateral talks this week -- which were to be at the foreign-secretary level -- is disappointing to Pakistan. Both countries had been developing closer ties before the Mumbai bombings.

Regarding the suspicions that Pakistan-based insurgents could have carried out the Mumbai bombing, Foreign Office spokesperson Tasneem Aslam said "our reaction is the same, we reject these allegations which are unsubstantiated."

Singh attended the G8 summit in Russia last weekend and met world leaders including U.S. President George W. Bush, who told him that "America mourns the loss of innocent life as a result of the terrorists attacks."

CNN's Satinder Bindra, Tess Eastment and Prithvi Banerjii contributed to this report.

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