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Graves dug for Bali bombers awaiting execution

  • Story Highlights
  • Three convicted bombers are scheduled to be executed by firing squad
  • One grave for man in same cemetery where father was buried
  • Hundreds of members of hardline Muslim groups plan protest
  • Deadly 2002 blasts ripped through two popular nightclubs in Bali's Kuta
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From Dan Rivers
CNN
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JAKARTA, Indonesia (CNN) -- Not many people know when the men convicted of killing 202 people in a bombing on the Indonesian island of Bali will be executed, but there's evidence that two executions are imminent.

People shout slogan Friday at a protest held in Jakarta supporting the convicted bombers.

People shout slogan Friday at a protest held in Jakarta supporting the convicted bombers.

That evidence is in the village of Tenggulun, in Indonesia's East Java province.

Here men have dug one grave for two of three men convicted in the 2002 bombings -- Amrozi bin Nurhasyim and his brother Mukhlas, who is also known as Ali Ghufron.

They are widely known by their first names -- Amrozi and Mukhlas. Another man, Imam Samudra, has also been sentenced to die for the bombings.

In this village, preparations are underway for the burial of the brothers in the same cemetery where their father is buried.

The stone and concrete tombs and headstones are dotted beneath flowering trees. A few fields away, a helicopter landing pad has been marked out amid tapioca fields. The bodies are due to be flown in from Nusa Kampangan prison after the executions and once the necessary paperwork has been completed.

The three bombers are scheduled to be executed by firing squad at that prison, but authorities will not say when.

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Hundreds of members of hardline Muslim groups have arrived in this village. Some threaten revenge and say others will take the place of Amrozi and Mukhlas.

The deadly bombing ripped through two popular nightclubs in Kuta, on the Indonesian resort island of Bali, in October 2002.

The blasts killed 202 people -- many of them young Australians -- and injured more than 300. Dozens of victims were burned beyond recognition or blown to pieces by the massive blasts.

Amrozi's and Mukhlas' brother, Ja'far Shodeq, told CNN he still believes his siblings are innocent. He claimed Amrozi was in Tenggulun the night of the attack watching football, despite Amrozi's admission to CNN that he bought the explosive ingredients and the van used in the attack.

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The men showed neither fear nor remorse in recent interviews with CNN. They had asked to be beheaded, saying it was the Islamic way of execution, but authorities plan to execute them by firing squad.

A lawyer for the men said he has sent a letter to the president of Indonesia but would not say what the letter said.

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