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Suspected U.S. missile strike kills 7 in Pakistan

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  • Suspected U.S. missile strike kills seven people in Pakistan
  • At least two missiles hit two vehicles in South Waziristan, sources say
  • Vehicles hit as they were parked near a bridge
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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- A suspected U.S. missile strike killed seven people Wednesday in Pakistan's turbulent tribal region, a political official and an intelligence source told CNN.

At least two missiles hit two vehicles, the sources said, as they were about to cross a bridge. The strike happened in the evening near the village of Makeen in South Waziristan, according to the sources -- asked not to be identified because they are not authorized to speak to the media.

But one eyewitness told CNN in a phone interview that the cars were parked. That source said there were foreigners among the dead and that the attack took place in a known stronghold of militant Baitullah Mehsud. He is leader of the Pakistani Taliban, according to military officials, analysts and think tanks that study Pakistan's militant groups.

This development comes as the United States -- using unmanned drones -- has carried out several airstrikes inside Pakistan on suspected militant targets.

Pakistan is under enormous pressure to control the militants within its borders, blamed for launching attacks in neighboring Afghanistan where U.S. and NATO forces are fighting militants.

The country's military operation in the region is unpopular among Pakistanis, but efforts to deal diplomatically with militants have not worked in the past.

CNN's Reza Sayah and Zein Basravi contributed to this report.

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