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Discovery launch delayed by a day over weather concerns

By the CNN Wire Staff
Thursday's launch will be the 39th and final voyage for space shuttle Discovery.
Thursday's launch will be the 39th and final voyage for space shuttle Discovery.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The shuttle was set to blast off on Thursday afternoon
  • Discovery has flown more missions than any other shuttle
  • It flew the first female shuttle pilot and the first African-American spacewalker
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(CNN) -- Bad weather forced NASA to delay the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery by at least a day Thursday.

Mission managers will meet Friday at 5 a.m. ET to re-evaluate weather conditions, NASA said.

It was the latest in a series of delays for the 39th and final voyage for Discovery, the agency's oldest shuttle.

Discovery's six crew members were scheduled to deliver a pressurized logistics module that will help provide more storage to the space station.

"We've gotten into a configuration now on the space station where we have a lot of stuff and we don't have a lot of space to put it in," said Royce Renfrew, lead space station flight director for the mission.

The latest launch attempt had been set for Thursday afternoon.

Before that, it was expected to blast off Monday, but Discovery was delayed to repair helium and nitrogen leaks in its system.

A planned Tuesday liftoff was canceled so engineers could fix a glitch to a backup system that controls a main engine.

With 38 voyages to date, Discovery has flown more missions than any other orbiter in the fleet.

It also made history along the way, NASA said.

Discovery flew the first female shuttle pilot, the first African-American spacewalker and the first sitting member of Congress to go to space.

CNN's Faith Karimi contributed to this report.

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