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ICC in talks over surrender of Gadhafi son

From Zain Verjee, CNN
October 28, 2011 -- Updated 1450 GMT (2250 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: The prosecutor promises no deals for Gadhafi son's surrender
  • The International Criminal Court has issued a warrant for Gadhafi's arrest
  • The court is having "conversations" about Saif al-Islam's surrender
  • Al-Islam's whereabouts are unknown

(CNN) -- The International Criminal Court is having "informal conversations" about the surrender of Moammar Gadhafi's son, Saif al-Islam, who is wanted for crimes against humanity, the court's chief prosecutor said Friday.

Luis Moreno-Ocampo would not say with whom the court is talking. He also said the court does not know al-Islam's whereabouts.

If Saif al-Islam Gadhafi is brought before the court, Moreno-Ocampo said, he will "have all the rights and be protected," and will be allowed to present his defense.

"We believe we have a strong case," the prosecutor told CNN in an exclusive interview from The Hague. "We believe he should be convicted."

Do Libyans care who killed Gadhafi?

The court believes Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, his father, and his brother-in-law Abdulla al-Sanussi are responsible for crimes against humanity in Libya, including murder and persecution across the country beginning in February amid anti-government demonstrations, Moreno-Ocampo said.

Al-Sanussi served as the head of intelligence for Moammar Gadhafi, who was captured by opposition fighters and killed last week.

Moreno-Ocampo promised there would be no deals for Saif al-Islam Gadhafi's surrender.

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