Skip to main content

Euro failure is 'luxury we can't afford,' Sarkozy warns

By the CNN Wire Staff
December 8, 2011 -- Updated 1724 GMT (0124 HKT)
German leader Angela Merkel arrives in France ahead of a crucial meeting later in Brussels billed as make or break for the Euro
German leader Angela Merkel arrives in France ahead of a crucial meeting later in Brussels billed as make or break for the Euro
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: U.S. stocks fall after the European Central Bank doesn't say it will buy debt
  • If the European Union fails this week, it will not get a second chance, Sarkozy says
  • Germany and France want the EU to have more influence over national budgets
  • Britain's David Cameron may be an obstacle to the changes

Brussels, Belgium (CNN) -- European leaders must band together to save the euro this week, the leaders of the eurozone's two biggest economies said Thursday, even as the head of the European Central Bank was warning of more bad economic times ahead.

Failure to reach an agreement at a summit in Brussels, Belgium, is a "luxury we cannot afford," French President Nicolas Sarkozy said.

"This is our duty. We have no other choice," he said, warning that the European Union would not get a second chance.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said countries had to put their "national egotisms" aside and find a joint solution to the continent's debt crisis.

The national debts of euro members, including Ireland and Greece, have pushed the common currency to the brink of collapse, forcing international lenders to swoop in with bailouts.

S&P issues Europe debt crisis warning
Will Germany bend the rules?
Euro crisis a global game changer?
Breaking down eurobonds

The budget cuts they have demanded have led to mass protests that brought down governments in both countries -- and they are not the only ones with worrying levels of debt.

The French minister for European affairs, Jean Leonetti, warned earlier Thursday that the euro could "explode" and Europe could "unravel."

That would be a "disaster not only for Europe but for the whole world," Leonetti told the French TV station Canal+ on Thursday morning.

Hours later, the European Central Bank cut a key interest rate to 1%, effective December 14. It's the second cut in the rate in as many months, bringing the rate down to match its lowest level ever.

The head of the bank, Mario Draghi, warned that inflation was likely to stay high in the eurozone and growth would remain low. He announced extraordinary measures to ease financial markets.

But he did not announce that the bank would buy up the debt of eurozone nations struggling to balance budgets, and U.S. stocks fell at the opening.

Germany and France are now pushing for more European Union influence over the national budgets of the countries that use the euro.

Sarkozy and Merkel will present details of their plans at the summit.

But the plans could require all 27 members of the European Union to agree to change fundamental EU treaties -- and British Prime Minister David Cameron has vowed to drive a hard bargain before he will go along.

The United Kingdom is one of 10 EU countries that do not use the euro.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has been touring Europe ahead of the summit to underline the importance of the EU's bringing the crisis under control.

"I want to emphasize again how important it is to the United States and to countries around the world that Europe succeeds in this effort to build a stronger Europe, and I'm confident they will succeed," Geithner said in France on Wednesday.

On Thursday he met Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti, who came to power when his country's government collapsed over a debt crisis.

Geithner assured Monti that Washington supported his efforts to balance his country's budget.

Monti said he would meet President Barack Obama in Washington next month.

Some details about another EU plan have already leaked.

European nations could be penalized by being stripped of some powers if they fail to manage their budgets, according to a confidential memo from European Commission President Herman Van Rompuy, leaked Tuesday.

Van Rompuy's proposals may be even stricter than those of Merkel and Sarkozy.

The five-page memo proposes that the European Commission might be given the right to strip voting rights within the European Union from some countries who have been bailed out but are still not meeting their deficit targets.

The executive arm of the EU could force bailed-out countries, such as Greece, Ireland and Portugal, to comply with deficit regulations, which for the entire EU currently stand at 3% of GDP.

The meeting will occur under the shadow of a recent report from the rating agency Standard & Poor's, which threatened to downgrade 15 eurozone member states. Even the AAA-rated nations France and Germany have been placed on review for possible downgrade as the debt crisis continues to worsen.

Two eurozone members were not placed on credit watch -- Greece, because its credit rating already reflects a high risk of default, and Cyprus, which was already under review.

CNN's Naima Benallal reported from Paris; CNN's Jim Boulden reported from Brussels; CNN's Hada Messia reported from Rome, and CNN's Nina dos Santos, Richard Allen Greene and Irene Chapple reported from London.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
August 27, 2013 -- Updated 1943 GMT (0343 HKT)
German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble says the eurozone's problems are not solved, but "we are in a much better shape than we used to be some years ago."
September 4, 2013 -- Updated 1528 GMT (2328 HKT)
The G20 is held in Russia but, amid disagreements over Syria, can anything be done? John Defterios investigates.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 1502 GMT (2302 HKT)
Summer could not have come soon enough for Lloret de Mar, a tourist resort north of Barcelona. Despite the country's troubles, it's partying.
June 7, 2013 -- Updated 1750 GMT (0150 HKT)
The euro club has suffered major shockwaves but its newest member has emerged as an economic star. What;s behind Estonia's success?
May 29, 2013 -- Updated 1323 GMT (2123 HKT)
The global recovery has two speeds: That of the stimulus-fed U.S. and that of the austerity-starved eurozone, according to a new report.
May 14, 2013 -- Updated 1326 GMT (2126 HKT)
The flags of the countries which make up the European Union, outside the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France.
The "rich man's club" of Europe faces economic decay as it struggles to absorb Europe's "poor people", according to economic experts.
May 27, 2013 -- Updated 0256 GMT (1056 HKT)
Europe's competitiveness is threatened as manufacturing companies scrambling to find enough skilled engineers.
July 10, 2013 -- Updated 1502 GMT (2302 HKT)
Spain's economic crisis is in its sixth straight year yet tourism, worth 11% of GDP, is holding its own, one of the few bright spots on a bleak horizon.
May 2, 2013 -- Updated 1044 GMT (1844 HKT)
As European financial markets close for the spring celebration of May Day, protesters across Europe and beyond have taken to the streets to demonstrate.
April 26, 2013 -- Updated 1210 GMT (2010 HKT)
As Croatia prepares to enter the 27-nation European Union, the country's Prime Minister says Italy must return to being the "powerhouse of Europe."
April 25, 2013 -- Updated 1656 GMT (0056 HKT)
Spain's unemployment rate rose to a record high of 27.2% in the first quarter of 2013, the Spanish National Institute of Statistics said Thursday.
March 25, 2013 -- Updated 1355 GMT (2155 HKT)
The financial uncertainty in Cyprus is generating images of long lines at ATM machines and anti-European Union protests.
March 25, 2013 -- Updated 1815 GMT (0215 HKT)
Cyprus will "step up efforts in areas of fiscal consolidation." Where have we heard that before? Oh yes. Greece.
March 23, 2013 -- Updated 0139 GMT (0939 HKT)
The Cyprus debt crisis is being felt by the banks but also by the people who work at them. Nick Paton Walsh reports.
March 22, 2013 -- Updated 0010 GMT (0810 HKT)
CNN's Nick Paton Walsh reports on a Russian hotel maid caught up in Cyprus' financial crisis.
March 18, 2013 -- Updated 1608 GMT (0008 HKT)
Never underestimate the capacity of the Eurozone to shoot itself in both feet, says CNN's Richard Quest.
February 21, 2013 -- Updated 1603 GMT (0003 HKT)
Spain has seen hundreds of protests since the "Indignados" movement erupted in 2011, marches and sit-ins are now common sights in the capital.
ADVERTISEMENT