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Police: 52 dead in Pakistani city after days of clashes

By the CNN Wire Staff
A Pakistani paramilitary soldier fires in the air in a western neighbourhood affected by the political violence in Karachi.
A Pakistani paramilitary soldier fires in the air in a western neighbourhood affected by the political violence in Karachi.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: 10 dead in shooting aboard a bus in Karachi
  • The violence began Tuesday, police say
  • The clashes involve Urdu-speaking and Pashto-speaking political parties
  • Violence between supporters of the two parties has caused many deaths in recent years
RELATED TOPICS
  • Karachi
  • Pakistan

(CNN) -- Ongoing sectarian violence has left 52 people dead in a southern Pakistani city in the last few days, police said Thursday.

Unknown gunmen opened fire Thursday evening on two buses in the city of Karachi, killing 10 people and wounding 20, said Muhammad Aslam, a Karachi police official.

In a separate incident Thursday evening in Karachi's Orangi Town neighborhood, three people were killed by shooting on a residential colony, Aslam said.

Another 11 people were killed Thursday, 18 on Wednesday and 10 on Tuesday, during clashes in several neighborhoods in Karachi, said Arslan Umar, a police official in the city.

The clashes have been blamed on a bitter rivalry between the political parties of Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) and the Awami National Party (ANP).

The MQM mostly represents Urdu-speaking people, who migrated to Pakistan from India during partition in 1947, while the Awami National Party, represents Pashto speakers -- more of whom are moving to Karachi from northwest Pakistan in search of jobs.

Violence between supporters of the two parties and other turf wars in Karachi have killed hundreds in recent years.

From CNN's Reza Sayah and journalist Nasir Habib.