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Latest developments in Norway terror attacks

By the CNN Wire Staff
Almost 200,000 people participate in a memorial Monday in downtown Oslo to honor the victims, authorities say.
Almost 200,000 people participate in a memorial Monday in downtown Oslo to honor the victims, authorities say.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The suspect was on drugs to make him stronger and more awake during the attacks, Lippestad says.
  • Police say they will announce Tuesday when they will publish the list of names of the victims.
  • Police continue to search Utoya island and the surrounding waters for four or five missing people, and the island itself for clues.

Oslo, Norway (CNN) -- At least 76 people died in Norway in a terror attack July 22 that started with a bomb blast in the capital Oslo and continued with an hour-long gun rampage at a camp for Labour Party teens and young adults on nearby Utoya Island. Police arrested a lone gunman, Anders Breivik, 32.

Here are the latest developments.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

--Anders Breivik was " a little bit surprised" that his attacks succeeded, his lawyer Geir Lippestad says Tuesday, adding that Breivik had not expected to get to Utoya Island.

--The suspect was on drugs to make him stronger and more awake during the attacks, Lippestad says. He says Breivik "may be" insane, but that it is too early to say if he will mount an insanity defense.

--Police say they will announce Tuesday when they will publish the list of names of the victims.

--Police continue to search Utoya island and the surrounding waters for four or five missing people, and the island itself for clues.

PREVIOUSLY REPORTED

--Anders Breivik, 32, appeared in closed court Monday. Judge Kim Heger later says Breivik admits carrying out the attacks but claims they were necessary to prevent the "colonization" of the country by Muslims. Breivik says the deaths are the price the Labour Party had to pay for its "treason," the judge says.

--Judge Heger orders Breivik held in custody for eight weeks, until his next court date. The first four weeks are to be in solitary confinement to prevent the possibility of tampering with evidence, the judge says.

--The suspect's father, Jens Breivik, tells Norway's TV2 that his son must have mental problems. "In my darkest moments, I think that rather than killing all those people, he should have taken his own life," the father says, answering a reporter's question about mental illness by saying: "There is no other way to explain it. A normal person would never do such a thing."

--Police announce Monday that the number of confirmed dead in the bombing is eight, an increase of one from previous reports. The number of dead on Utoya is 68, down from earlier reports as high as 86. That makes the confirmed death toll 76, down from earlier reports of 93.

--Police say they are investigating Breivik claims that two other terror cells assisted him in the attack. They do not confirm the existence of the cells.

--Breivik is charged with two acts of terrorism, police spokesman Henning Holtaas says. The maximum sentence is 21 years in prison, with the possibility of an extension at the end of the term if the court rules Breivik is still a threat. Norway does not execute people.

--A 1,518-page manifesto bearing Breivik's name circulates online, containing rants about the rising number of Muslims in Europe, describing detailed plans for getting weapons, explosives and fake uniforms, and saying how to avoid detection by police while preparing the attack.

--Almost 200,000 people participate in a memorial Monday in downtown Oslo to honor the victims, authorities say.

Ringerike hospital chief surgeon Colin Poole says he has never seen gunshot wounds like those of the victims from the island, and speculates the injuries were caused by expanding or "dum-dum" bullets, a hospital spokesman says. Police decline to comment on the type of bullets the gunman used.