Ex-News of the World chief Myler named editor of New York Daily News

 Colin Myler gave evidence to the Leveson Inquiry into the phone-hacking scandal in December 2011.

Story highlights

  • Colin Myler appointed editor-in-chief of New York Daily News
  • Myler lost job at scandal-hit British tabloid News of the World when it closed in July 2011
  • Newspaperman formerly edited Daily News' arch-rival, the Murdoch-owned New York Post
The editor who was at the helm of British tabloid News of the World when it closed amid the phone-hacking scandal has been appointed editor-in-chief of the New York Daily News.
Colin Myler, who oversaw the News of the World from 2007 until it was shut down in July 2011, has been a central figure in the controversy.
Myler, 59, formerly edited the Daily News' arch-rival, the Rupert Murdoch-owned New York Post, from 2001 until 2007.
He moved back to the UK to take over when his predecessor at the News of the World, Andy Coulson, resigned after the paper's royal editor, Clive Goodman, was jailed for hacking the phone messages of members of the royal family.
Last month, Myler gave evidence to the Leveson Inquiry into phone hacking over an e-mail he sent, warning that "unfortunately it is as bad as we feared."
In an internal memo sent to staff at the Daily News on Wednesday and seen by CNN, Myler, said he was "immensely proud and honored to be leading one of America's great newspapers into a new era."
In the same email, the paper's publisher, Mort Zuckerman, said the tabloid "will only get better under the leadership of Colin."