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Quad-core arms race 'ridiculous' says Microsoft exec

The FC PowerTrekk charger converts water into electricity to power a mobile. The FC PowerTrekk charger converts water into electricity to power a mobile.
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Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
Latest gadgets on display in Barcelona
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Microsoft executive calls quad-core processors unnecessary
  • Aaron Woodman says Nokia devices running Windows Phone are just as fast
  • Woodman has offered cash for anyone whose device can beat a Windows phone in a speed test

Editor's note: Will Findlater is editor of Stuff, one of the world's best-selling gadget magazines. Follow @stufftv on Twitter.

(CNN) -- The last full day of the Mobile World Congress show in Barcelona has drawn to a close. After a bonanza of new phones, tablets and mobile gadgets, here's the last of what's new at this year's show, courtesy of Stuff Magazine.

Quad-core arms race 'ridiculous'

Microsoft Windows Phone Director Aaron Woodman has stated his belief that competition between manufacturers to produce phones with faster and faster quad-core processors is unnecessary. "The quad-core arms race is ridiculous," said Woodman. Instead, he explained how Windows Phone devices like the Nokia Lumia 800 are able to run fast without using battery-sucking quad-core innards. Microsoft has even gone as far as handing out €100 ($133) to anyone whose phone can beat a Windows Phone in a one-on-one user test during MWC.

Sketching out the future of mobiles
BlackBerry in your car and in your hands

Microsoft releases Windows 8 preview

Microsoft announced the release of the consumer preview of its forthcoming Windows 8 operating system. The new software is designed to work on both computers and tablets, taking many design cues from its own Windows Phone 7 software. The company said it has made a staggering 100,000 code changes since the last preview. Early testers will be pleased to know that all apps in the Windows 8 app store are free to download during the preview.

LG phone delayed by UK's lack of 4G

LG's recently revealed Optimus Vu smartphone, which sports a 5-inch screen with an unusual 4:3 aspect ratio, won't be seen in the United Kingdom for at least a year. The long wait is due to the UK's lack of a 4G or LTE network. Other countries such as the United States are already enjoying super-fast 4G mobile data speeds while the UK lags behind.

Samsung previews projector phone

A prototype of the Samsung Galaxy Beam projector phone has been doing the rounds. The smartphone prototype runs on Google Android 2.3 and has a 15 lumens projector built into its top edge. Users can beam a 50-inch image on a blank wall or screen, perfect for showing off holiday snaps or giving impromptu presentations.

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February 22, 2013 -- Updated 1241 GMT (2041 HKT)
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