Skip to main content

'War of gods' captivates China

By Stan Grant, CNN
March 19, 2012 -- Updated 0849 GMT (1649 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Last week China's Communist leadership turned on one of its own, sacking Chongqing's Chief Bo Xilai
  • Was expected to become one of the exclusive nine members of the Politburo powerful standing committee
  • Veteran environmental campaigner Wu Deng Ming says this was a politburo power play
  • Wu says Bo made enemies within the party with his ambition and hunger for success

Beijing (CNN) -- Wu Deng Ming has seen it all.

As a boy he saw his country torn apart by war and revolution. He watched Mao Zedong's communists claim China for themselves.

Later, Wu swore his own allegiance by serving in the People's Liberation Army. But this is a man who's not one to toe the party line.

At 72 he has lost none of his vigor or the impish grin that has challenged authority for decades. Wu is seen as a hero of the environmental movement, one of the fathers of "green China."

He has been beaten, persecuted and threatened in his fight against big business and officialdom.

He bounds down the stairs to meet me at his office in the leafy surroundings of a university in the southwestern Chinese city of Chongqing, a firm handshake and talking rapidly. Wu is an old man who's seen too much to bother with caution. If he thinks it, he says it.

"This is a fight between gods, way beyond the reach of ordinary people," he says.

The rise and fall of China's Bo Xilai

The fight is a political drama that has gripped the entire country. The gods in question are the secretive inner circle of the Communist Party. What reads like a big-screen political thriller has thrust Chongqing, a city of more than 30 million people, into the spotlight.

Reaction mixed to Bo Xilai's ouster
Regional chief of Chongqing dismissed

Last week the party turned on one of its own, sacking Chongqing's Chief, Bo Xilai. But Bo is not some faceless official, he is what the Chinese call a "princeling."

His father was a revolutionary icon, a hero of the fabled long march when Communist rebels fled nationalist forces at the height of the civil war in the 1940s to regroup and storm to power.

China axes Bo Xilai from Chongqing after scandal

Bo has done more than live in his father's shadow, he has been a star in his own right. Tall, handsome and charismatic, he was widely expected to become one of the exclusive nine members of the Politburo's all-powerful standing committee later this year.

He made his mark in Chongqing, credited with transforming the city. Economic growth has galloped way ahead of the national average, while the city's infrastructure -- roads, office towers and shopping malls -- has rapidly modernized.

Bo married new-style Chinese capitalism with old-style Maoist rhetoric. He fashioned himself as "redder than red." Communist slogans sprung up around Chongqing and people were urged to sing cultural revolution-era songs.

The poor flocked to the city from rural villages looking for a better life. Many are glowing in their praise for Bo.

"I felt lost and my heart was heavy when I heard the news (of his sacking)," one man tells CNN.

Another lady, who works up to 15 hours a day shining shoes in the city center, says life is better for the elderly and the poor because of the ousted Bo.

"The city is greener and safer," she adds.

Bo also cracked down on crime. Under his orders, police busted gangs and locked up corrupt businessmen. While it won praise in some circles, critics said he used it as cover to persecute rivals.

The crackdown ultimately led to Bo's downfall. His former top cop and right-hand man, Wang Lijun, spectacularly sought refuge in an American consulate earlier this year, claiming his life was in danger. Since then there's been a lot rumor and innuendo but the truth has been lost in Chongqing's famous haze.

"No one can know," another local Chongqing man tells me. "We know nothing!"

To the man who's seen it all, this is a politburo power play. Wu has watched Bo up close for years and says he was too ambitious, too desperate for success.

"Bo made enemies," he says, adding that he took his "neo-maoist" campaign too far.

But Wu says this is about more than just Bo. This is about a system that has strayed too far from the people.

"Bo Xilai thinks like a feudalistic dictator and treat ordinary people like his subjects," he says. "I think only when Communist officials start treating people as their masters will people start wholeheartedly supporting the Party."

As the party's gods try to manage the transition to a new generation of leaders, they are looking all too human. The fallout from this saga of ambition, intrigue and betrayal is yet to be determined.

Wu has seen it all before. As he looks down from his office window he views the future through his own past and knows turmoil is never far away.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
See CNN's complete coverage on China.
July 18, 2014 -- Updated 0230 GMT (1030 HKT)
Some savvy individuals in China are claiming naming rights to valuable foreign brands. Here's how companies can combat them.
July 16, 2014 -- Updated 0911 GMT (1711 HKT)
Is Xi Jinping a true reformist or merely a "dictator" in disguise? CNN's Beijing bureau chief Jaime FlorCruz dissects the leader's policies
July 8, 2014 -- Updated 0344 GMT (1144 HKT)
With a population of 1.3 billion, you'd think that there would be 11 people in China who are good enough to put up a fight on the football pitch.
July 4, 2014 -- Updated 0631 GMT (1431 HKT)
26-year-old Ji Cheng is the first rider from China to compete for competitive cycling's highest honor.
July 7, 2014 -- Updated 1124 GMT (1924 HKT)
China's richest man, Wang Jianlin, may not yet be a household name outside of China, but that could be about to change.
July 4, 2014 -- Updated 0414 GMT (1214 HKT)
Hong Kong's narrow streets were once a dazzling gallery of neon, where banks and even bordellos plied their trade under sizzling tubular signs.
July 3, 2014 -- Updated 2357 GMT (0757 HKT)
When President Xi Jinping arrives in Seoul this week, the Chinese leader will have passed over North Korea in favor of its arch rival.
July 3, 2014 -- Updated 1159 GMT (1959 HKT)
Three more officials have been given the chop as part of China's anti-corruption drive, including former aides to the retired security chief.
July 1, 2014 -- Updated 1305 GMT (2105 HKT)
As thousands of Hong Kongers prepare for an annual protest, voices in China's press warn pro-democracy activism is a bad idea.
June 30, 2014 -- Updated 0437 GMT (1237 HKT)
Hong Kongers are demanding the right to directly elect their next leader, setting up a face-off with Beijing.
July 1, 2014 -- Updated 0656 GMT (1456 HKT)
The push for democratic reform in Hong Kong is testing China's "one country, two systems" model.
June 30, 2014 -- Updated 1156 GMT (1956 HKT)
Along a winding Chinese mountain road dotted with inns and restaurants is Jinan Orphanage, a place of refuge and site for troubled parents to dump unwanted children.
June 26, 2014 -- Updated 0836 GMT (1636 HKT)
CNN's Kristie Lu Stout invites Isaac Mao, Han Dongfang, and James Miles to discuss the rise of civil society in China and social media's crucial role.
June 26, 2014 -- Updated 0334 GMT (1134 HKT)
Chen Guangbiao wants rich people to give more to charity and he'll do anything to get their attention, including buying lunch for poor New Yorkers.
June 26, 2014 -- Updated 1144 GMT (1944 HKT)
Architects are planning to build the future world's tallest towers in China. They're going to come in pretty colors.
June 23, 2014 -- Updated 1147 GMT (1947 HKT)
Anna Coren visits Yulin's annual dog meat festival. Dogs are part of the daily diet here, with an estimated 10,000 dogs killed for the festival alone.
June 19, 2014 -- Updated 0638 GMT (1438 HKT)
People know little about sex, but are having plenty of it. We take a look at the ramifications of a lack of sex education in China.
June 13, 2014 -- Updated 0812 GMT (1612 HKT)
Hong Kongers have reacted angrily to a Chinese government white paper affirming Beijing's control over the territory.
The emphasis on national glory -- rather than purely personal achievement -- is key.
June 16, 2014 -- Updated 1614 GMT (0014 HKT)
A replica of the Effel Tower in Tianducheng, a luxury real estate development located in Hangzhou, east China's Zhejiang province.
What's the Eiffel Tower doing in China? Replica towns of the world's most famous monuments spring up all over China.
June 11, 2014 -- Updated 0013 GMT (0813 HKT)
Rapid development hasn't just boosted the economy -- it has opened up vast swathes of the country, says a man who has spent much of his life exploring it.
June 10, 2014 -- Updated 0654 GMT (1454 HKT)
The World Cup is apparently making a lot of people "ill" in China.
ADVERTISEMENT