Skip to main content

Sauber boss backs F1 budget cap

April 3, 2012 -- Updated 1535 GMT (2335 HKT)
Sauber CEO Monisha Kaltenborn would welcome a budget cap to help small teams to compete with
Sauber CEO Monisha Kaltenborn would welcome a budget cap to help small teams to compete with "the big four."
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Sauber team CEO calls for budget caps for Formula One teams
  • Monisha Kaltenborn says "some kind of budget cap" would make the sport "more interesting"
  • F1 chief Bernie Ecclestone said in March that elite teams need to cut spending
  • Sauber enjoying a strong start to 2012 season with second place at recent Malaysian Grand Prix

(CNN) -- The chief executive of Formula One team Sauber has backed recent calls for a budget cap saying that it would make the sport "more interesting."

"In my view, the future should indeed lie in some kind of budget cap under which each and every team could do what they want to, because we all have different strengths," Monisha Kaltenborn, CEO of the Swiss-based team, said in an interview with Formula1.com.

"How much longer will it take for the big teams to understand that the smaller teams are just as important to Formula One as the four big ones?"

Prior to the season opener in Australia last month, F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone told the sport's elite teams to cut their spending, while suggesting a mandatory budget cap could be introduced.

How much longer will it take for the big teams to understand that the smaller teams are just as important to Formula One as the four big ones?
Monisha Kaltenborn, CEO of F1 team Sauber

"The teams have to learn to be competitive without tons of money. They have to refocus again on the basics -- on racing, spending on the sport -- and not on baronial motor homes and all kinds of entertainment," Ecclestone told Formula1.com.

The division of prize money and television revenue in F1 is dictated by the Concorde Agreement, a contract between the sport's governing body, the FIA, the rights holders and the Formula One Teams Association (FOTA) which is due to expire in 2013.

Ecclestone is keen to explore the possibility of restricting teams' spending in the future.

"I would welcome it," he said. "Yes, I think it could happen. We are in the middle of discussions ... They (the teams) want to get more money -- to be able to spend more!" he said.

Monisha Kaltenborn: The woman racing ahead in F1

Kaltenborn is hoping to see a "major step forward" soon.

"When the current Concorde Agreement comes to an end at the end of this season, I think it would be a good time to set some kind of rules," she said.

The Sauber team has started the 2012 season impressively with 22-year-old Mexican driver Sergio Perez claiming second place behind Ferrari's Fernando Alonso at the Malaysian Grand Prix.

After what Kaltenborn described as "painful" second half to last season, she says the team is now settling down after the departure of manufacturer BMW at the end of 2009.

"I certainly hope we can keep up this momentum! I am pretty confident that we are moving in the right direction and hopefully we can maintain this level," she said.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Track the buzz of the 2014 Formula One season, race by race, with all the latest social reaction from motorsport experts.
September 19, 2014 -- Updated 1358 GMT (2158 HKT)
Take the fittest driver in Formula One and test him against two of the world's leading triathletes in a high-performance laboratory.
September 5, 2014 -- Updated 1604 GMT (0004 HKT)
Mercedes has the fastest two cars in Formula One this season but there is just one problem -- there can only be one world champion.
He's the best of the rest -- Daniel Ricciardo has been Formula One's surprise package in the first half of the 2014 season.
July 24, 2014 -- Updated 1135 GMT (1935 HKT)
Formula One is not likely to go hungry in Hungary as master chefs cater in volume for drivers, teams and VIP guests.
July 3, 2014 -- Updated 1443 GMT (2243 HKT)
It's the elephant in the room of Formula One. What's the prognosis legendary driver Michael Schumacher?
May 23, 2014 -- Updated 2310 GMT (0710 HKT)
It stimulates all five senses, creating an unparalleled experience for drivers and fans alike. Take a tour of Monaco with Mark Webber.
May 22, 2014 -- Updated 1233 GMT (2033 HKT)
To be a champion you must win a title -- but to become an F1 legend you must win races at Monaco, the calendar's most testing circuit.
May 5, 2014 -- Updated 1238 GMT (2038 HKT)
The Formula One driver transcended his sport and even 20 years after his death, Ayrton Senna commands the adoration of fans worldwide.
May 1, 2014 -- Updated 1500 GMT (2300 HKT)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY IN ARABIC BY SUHEIL HOWAYEK: (FILES) Brazilian F1 driver Ayrton Senna adjusts his rear view mirror in the pits 01 May 1994 before the start of the San Marino Grand Prix. Senna died after crashing in the seventh lap. Some 45 drivers, including Senna and Canadian Gilles Villeneuve, have been killed during Formula One races whose tracks are dubbed by some as the 'circuits of death.' AFP PHOTO/JEAN-LOUP GAUTREAU (Photo credit should read JEAN-LOUP GAUTREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
F1's greatest racer was killed during the San Marino Grand Prix on May 1 1994. The sport hasn't been the same since.
ADVERTISEMENT