Murray relishes Wimbledon's home comforts

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    Story highlights

    • Britain's Andy Murray preparing for two championships at Wimbledon this summer
    • London Olympic tournament follows All England Championships
    • Murray believes it is "a huge bonus" to be playing on home soil
    • Scot's coach Ivan Lendl reached Wimbledon final twice -- but never won title
    Andy Murray believes "the green, green grass of home" can be his theme tune for a memorable summer in 2012.
    Scot Murray will have two chances of glory on the All England courts this summer, with the Wimbledon Championships followed by a chance of Olympic glory on home soil.
    And he insists the passionate Wimbledon crowds will prove an inspiration, rather than a burden, in his bid for a glorious summer double.
    "I think in all sports it is a huge bonus to be playing at home," Murray told CNN.
    "When it comes to tennis there is sort of a myth that it is a disadvantage to be playing in front of a home crowd, that getting all the extra support puts all the pressure on you. But I think that when you look over the years it has normally helped players raise their game by being at home."
    Stage one of Murray's home double will determine his build-up to stage two, with preparation for the U.S. Open also on his summer radar.
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    "I'm not exactly sure what I am going to do," Murray admitted. "A bit depends how well I play at Wimbledon because the U.S. Open is close after the Olympics.
    "After Wimbledon I might go and practice on hard courts for a week or 10 days so that I am not spending too long on the grass. Normally it is four weeks on the grass for the year and that's it, whereas this year it is around eight or nine weeks. I need to change a little bit the way I prepare myself for the Olympics."
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    Central to that preparation will be Murray's influential coach, twice Wimbledon finalist Ivan Lendl, who is concentrating as much on Murray's mental preparation as any on-court approach.
    Murray explained: "He obviously has a lot of experience preparing for the major events. We have made some changes to certain things and he is very understanding.
    "He is someone I can speak to about my emotions, nerves, pressure, stress, tiredness. It is good to have someone around who you can discuss all of those things with and who can give you advice on how to deal with them.
    "Aside from that, he has a very good talent and practical knowledge."
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    Lendl won eight grand slam titles and reached the semi-finals or beyond at Wimbledon seven times in an eight-year spell, without ever lifting the coveted All England trophy.
    Murray added: "In grand slams (the mental side) can be easier now than in other events because of the five-set match. If you play a bad set there is time to come back, so you know that there is no real need to panic early on.
    "You need that extra length of time on the court to work out how to win the match and how to change your tactics in the middle of it. When you are playing in a best-of-three-set match you know the match can get away from you very quickly if you get off to a bad start.
    "So it is just as important to focus on the tactics and understand what is going on on the courts. If you get too wrapped up in everything else it can be detrimental."
    Former British number one Tim Henman believes Murray's decision to bring in Lendl for advice was a "brilliant" decision.
    "Lendl is one of the legends of the game, he's had so many experiences, he was a guy who lost his first four grand slam finals," Henman told CNN.
    "Murray's been in three finals and hasn't been able to win one of them. I think if he could get into that situation again then it would be a big asset.
    "The standard of the era that he's in is probably the toughest there's ever been, so he's got to keep improving and I'm sure he'll do that."