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Michele Bachmann and Muslim witch hunts

By Haris Tarin, Special to CNN
July 30, 2012 -- Updated 2330 GMT (0730 HKT)
Rep. Michele Bachmann wants an investigation into whether American Muslims are sabotaging the U.S. government from within.
Rep. Michele Bachmann wants an investigation into whether American Muslims are sabotaging the U.S. government from within.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Haris Tarin: American Muslims in public life face constant scrutiny over loyalty
  • Tarin: But Michele Bachmann, four others take conspiracy theory to an extreme
  • He says Bachmann witch hunt indicts Hillary Clinton's longtime adviser Huma Abedin
  • Tarin hopes this is a tipping point, when politicians stop tolerating this bigotry

Editor's note: Haris Tarin is the director of the Washington office of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.

(CNN) -- It is difficult being an American Muslim engaged in civic activities, let alone working in government or politics. We Muslims must always second-guess what we say, guard against people questioning our loyalty and make sure that nobody thinks we are trying to infiltrate the government to sabotage it from within and hand it over to the Muslim Brotherhood.

Most Americans would dismiss these accusations, especially the last one, as outrageous conspiracy theories written by loonies on their blogs. Yet American Muslim public servants are facing these charges from sitting members of Congress. The sad reality is that it has been happening for a decade, and has been met with complete indifference from the media and the public.

Recently, Rep. Michele Bachmann, briefly the front-runner for GOP presidential candidate, sent letters to the State Department, Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security asking them to investigate American Muslim organizations, individuals and government employees to determine if they are infiltrating the government and sabotaging it from within. This week, Newt Gringrich wrote an op-ed defending Bachmann's request.

Bachmann and her friends -- Republican representatives Trent Franks of Arizona, Louie Gohmert of Texas, Tom Rooney of Florida and Lynn Westmoreland of Georgia -- pulled out all the stops. They not only hurled these outrageous claims at our organization, the Muslim Public Affairs Council, and others like ours, but also accuse Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's deputy chief-of-staff of being part of the conspiracy.

Haris Tarin
Haris Tarin

Huma Abedin, married to former New York Rep. Anthony Weiner, has served Clinton since she was the first lady. The slurs against her are beyond malicious. They accuse Abedin's late father and her family of being a part of an international conspiracy seeking to sabotage the United States.

This latest witch hunt comes as no surprise to those of us in public life. This is a natural next step for hate mongers. First, people who do not have mainstream political backing start the rumors. Next, if we take a page from Sen. Joseph McCarthy's 1950s playbook, the rumors become accusations leveled by the most politically privileged. It's simple -- the more accusations thrown at American Muslims trying to serve their country, the harder it is for them to be hired and the more politicians shy away from engaging them.

For years, we have watched presidential candidates talking about their discomfort with appointing Muslims to senior positions in government. We have seen them sparring over our ethics and principles. Legislation against Sharia law has been introduced in 20 states, frightening residents into thinking Sharia is an imminent threat. President Obama still faces vicious and pointed accusations of being a Muslim, as though it were a slur.

These attacks are real and hurt people's lives. Public servants have been forced out of jobs, with suspicion shadowing them. Very few public officials have had the courage to publicly condemn the escalating witch hunt. Will this latest absurdity finally force our politicians and policy-makers to not only defend someone like Huma Abedin, whose public service needs no defense, but also all American Muslims who serve this country every day?

A few Republicans have rallied to Abedin's side. This week, Ed Rollins, Bachmann's former campaign chief, denounced her in an op-ed on Fox News. Speaker of the House John Boehner defended Abedin's character.

Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain felt compelled to stand on the floor of the Senate and denounce the accusations. "Ultimately, what is at stake in this matter is larger even than the reputation of one person. This is about who we are as a nation, and who we aspire to be," he said.

The question is whether this incident will serve as a tipping point. Will our political and religious leaders and the media push back against Islamophobes whose clear agenda is to marginalize American Muslims? Will this wave of McCarthyism be exposed, condemned and made politically unacceptable? Will American Muslim public servants be able to serve their country without suspicion?

Every year, my organization brings 25 young American Muslim leaders to Washington to help them better understand policy making. The majority are inspired to develop careers in government and public service.

Yet every year I ask myself: Are these individuals better off in banking, medicine and less high-profile careers? Am I exposing them to a career that will be tarnished by the likes of Michele Bachmann? In the end, I still believe that the sacrifice to serve this nation and make America a better place is worth the headache, and heartache, of dealing with bigots -- including those in Congress.

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The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Haris Tarin.

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