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Nature up close: Stunning science photographs

The brightly colored peacock mantis shrimp has one of the most complex visual systems in the marine world, and powerful club-like appendages that can smash through the shells of molluscs. Photo by Gary Granitch. The brightly colored peacock mantis shrimp has one of the most complex visual systems in the marine world, and powerful club-like appendages that can smash through the shells of molluscs. Photo by Gary Granitch.
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Mantis Shrimp
Humpback Whale Mating
Fly in Amber
Tracking Alzheimer's Disease
Lord Howe Island Stick Insect Hatching
Towards Solar Maximum
Red-throat Travels
Killer in a Cage
Green Lacewing
Another Day in the Life of Arabidopsis
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography announced August 28
  • Prize given each year for photos that communicate an aspect of science

(CNN) -- The New Scientist Eureka Prize for Science Photography is awarded annually for photographs that effectively communicate an aspect of science.

Part of the Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, and open only to Australians, this year's entries show everything from exotic insects to solar flares and diseased neurons.

Here are the 10 best entries, selected by the organizers. The winner will be announced on August 28.

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