U.S. House passes short-term spending plan

The U.S. House of Representative passed a short-term spending measure to keep the government funded through March.

Story highlights

  • Bill would fund the federal government for six months
  • House-passed measure still must be considered by Senate

A short-term spending measure to keep the U.S. government funded through March won approval Thursday from the House of Representatives, sending it to the Senate for consideration.

By a 329-to-91 vote, the Republican-led House passed the so-called continuing resolution agreed to by party leaders earlier this summer to avoid a budget showdown during the fall election campaign.

Current funding for federal agencies is due to expire at month's end.

The House plan extends government funding through March at the annual spending level -- $1.047 trillion --- agreed to in a previous congressional deal to raise the debt ceiling.

Short-term spending bills have become more common due to partisan gridlock in Washington that has prevented compromises needed to pass funding bills through the regular appropriations process.

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