Cookie consent

We use cookies to improve your experience on this website. By continuing to browse our site you agree to our use of cookies. Tell me more | Cookie preferences

U.S. sends new acting ambassador to Libya

    Just Watched

    Clinton: Benghazi answers are coming

Clinton: Benghazi answers are coming 01:06

Story highlights

  • Laurence Pope is the new charge d'affairs in Libya, handling ambassador duties
  • He came out of retirement to take the job
  • The United States vows to continue building ties with Libya

The United States has a new charge d'affairs in Libya to oversee diplomatic efforts in the wake of Ambassador Chris Stevens' killing.

Laurence Pope arrived Thursday in Tripoli to take on the role, the State Department announced. With no ambassador in the country, Pope will handle those duties.

State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said Pope "looks forward to working with the Libyan government and the Libyan people during this historic and challenging time, as we build strong economic, social, political, and educational bridges between our two people."

    Just Watched

    Consulate attack: What really happened

Consulate attack: What really happened 02:36
PLAY VIDEO

    Just Watched

    Demanding answers on Libya attack

Demanding answers on Libya attack 08:12
PLAY VIDEO

"We will continue to assist as Libya builds democratic institutions and broad respect for the rule of law -- the goals that Ambassador Stevens worked hard to achieve," Nuland said in a written statement.

Pope, who was born in 1945, is coming out of retirement to take the job.

A speaker of Arabic and French, he spent decades in the diplomatic ranks, beginning in 1969, before retiring in 2000. He held some senior posts, including director of Northern Gulf Affairs, associate director for counterterrorism, and political adviser to the commander of U.S. Central Command.

      CNN Recommends

    • pkg clancy north korea nuclear dreams_00002004.jpg

      As "We are the World" plays, a video shows what looks like a nuclear attack on the U.S. Jim Clancy reports on a bizarre video from North Korea.
    • Photojournalist Alison Wright travelled the world to capture its many faces in her latest book, "Face to Face: Portraits of the Human Spirit."
    • pkg rivers uk football match fixing_00005026.jpg

      Europol claims 380 soccer matches, including top level ones, were fixed - as the scandal widens, CNN's Dan Rivers looks at how it's done.
    • No Eiffel Towers, Statues of Liberties, Mt. Rushmores, Taj Mahals, Aussie koalas or Chairman Maos.

      It's an essential part of any trip, an activity we all take part in. Yet almost none of us are any good at it. Souvenir buying is too often an obligatory slog.