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Car blast in Tel Aviv possibly work of organized crime, police say

Investigators look at a damaged car after it exploded near the Israeli defence ministry in Tel Aviv on January 10, 2013.

Story highlights

  • Four people were injured, police said
  • The blast occurred near a bus in Tel Aviv
  • Police are searching for a motorbike

A car exploded in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv on Thursday, but police say they don't think the blast was terror-related.

The explosion occurred near a bus, and four people were injured by glass and shrapnel

Police say they believe the strike was an assassination attempt related to organized crime.

Investigators want to know whether an explosive was planted in or thrown at the car, which could be seen engulfed in flames on Israeli TV.

They are searching for a motorbike in connection with the incident.

Read more: Arrest announced in Tel Aviv bus bombing

Two months ago, a bus was bombed in Tel Aviv, a strike that wounded 24 people and that police regard as a terror attack.

An Arab-Israeli was arrested in connection with the blast. Police said the attacker was carrying out orders from Hamas and Islamic Jihad.

Read more: Egyptian activist blogger takes message of peace to Israel

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