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Killer captured after being mistakenly freed in Chicago

From AnneClaire Stapleton, CNN
February 2, 2013 -- Updated 0812 GMT (1612 HKT)
Steven L. Robbins was taken into custody without incident in Kankakee, Ill.
Steven L. Robbins was taken into custody without incident in Kankakee, Ill.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Steven Robbins was serving a 60-year prison sentence for murder
  • He was taken to an Illinois court for unrelated charges
  • Those weapons and drug charges were dropped
  • It is unclear if Robbins' tattoo of the name Nicole helped in the search

(CNN) -- Authorities captured a convicted murderer whom Chicago authorities mistakenly released from custody.

Steven Robbins, 44, convicted of a 2002 murder in Indianapolis,had been on the run for three days before he was captured in Illinois Friday night.

After interviewing Robbins' family and friends, they were able to determine where he was, the Cook County Sheriff's Department said.

They captured Robbins in the city of Kankakee, about 60 miles away from Chicago.

A solemn-faced Robbins, dressed in blue jeans and spotless new shoes, was photographed by Cook County authorities after his arrest and before he was put into a police car.

This saga started on Tuesday when Robbins was taken from an Indianapolis prison to Illinois for a court hearing on unrelated weapons and drug charges, according to the Indiana Department of Correction.

Both of those charges were dropped and Robbins was supposed to be returned to the Indiana prison to continue serving his 60-year sentence for the murder.

That did not happen.

During the manhunt, authorities released one clue that they said may help in the search.

On the right side of his neck, there's a tattoo that says "Nicole."

It was unclear Thursday whether Nicole was instrumental in the apprehension or lived in the area where Robbins was captured.

Robbins was convicted in the May 2002 shooting death of a 21-year-old man who tried to stop a street fight between Robbins and his wife Nicole Robbins, according to court documents.

In Session's Kisa Santiago contributed to this report.

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