Skip to main content

Iran to add lawsuit over 'Argo' to cinematic response

By Jethro Mullen and Ben Brumfield, CNN
March 14, 2013 -- Updated 0540 GMT (1340 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Iranian state media: Argo gives a distorted image of the Iranian people
  • A French lawyer says she will defend Iran against films that harm the country
  • The film does not purport to be an exact account of events
  • Iran is also to fund a cinematic response to "Argo"

(CNN) -- First, Iran said it would produce its own cinematic response to "Argo." Now, Tehran plans to sue Hollywood filmmakers who contribute to the production of such "anti-Iran" propaganda films.

State-run Press TV reports that Iranian officials have talked to an "internationally-renowned" French lawyer about filing such a suit.

"I will defend Iran against the films like 'Argo,' which are produced in Hollywood to distort the country's image," said Isabelle Coutant-Peyre.

The true story behind 'Argo'
Jimmy Carter: 'Argo' a great drama
Embassy workers discuss the real 'Argo'

Ex-Iran hostages hope 'Argo' win boosts quest for reparations

"Argo," directed by Ben Affleck, who also played the lead role, is about the rescue of U.S. diplomats during the Iran hostage crisis. The film, released in 2012, won the Oscar for best picture garnered Affleck a Golden Globe as director and also took the Golden Globe for best drama movie.

The film claims to be based on a true story rather than to constitute a scrupulous retelling of what took place, and its deviations from reality have been documented.

Iran plans to fund a movie titled "The General Staff," about 20 American hostages who were handed over to the United States by Iranian revolutionaries, according to a report by Mehr News, an official Iranian agency.

Press TV has detailed its objections to "Argo."

"The Iranophobic American movie attempts to describe Iranians as overemotional, irrational, insane and diabolical while at the same, the CIA agents are represented as heroically patriotic," it complained.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
July 13, 2014 -- Updated 2058 GMT (0458 HKT)
Tichleman 1
A makeup artist, writer and model who loves monkeys and struggles with demons.
July 11, 2014 -- Updated 1342 GMT (2142 HKT)
Lionel Messi's ability is not in question -- but will the World Cup final allow him to emerge from another footballing legend's shadow?
July 11, 2014 -- Updated 1029 GMT (1829 HKT)
Why are Iraqi politicians dragging their feet while ISIS militants fortify their foothold across the country?
July 11, 2014 -- Updated 1332 GMT (2132 HKT)
An elephant, who was chained for 50 years, cries tears of joy after being freed in India. CNN's Sumnima Udas reports.
July 11, 2014 -- Updated 0732 GMT (1532 HKT)
Beneath a dusty town in northeastern Pakistan, CNN explores a cold labyrinth of hidden tunnels that was once a safe haven for militants.
July 10, 2014 -- Updated 2249 GMT (0649 HKT)
CNN's Ravi Agrawal asks whether Narendra Modi can harness the country's potential to finally deliver growth.
July 10, 2014 -- Updated 0444 GMT (1244 HKT)
CNN's Ben Wedeman visits the Yazji family and finds out what it's like living life in the middle of conflict.
July 9, 2014 -- Updated 1423 GMT (2223 HKT)
Israel has deployed its Iron Dome defense system to halt incoming rockets. Here's how it works.
Even those who aren't in the line of fire feel the effects of the chaos that has engulfed Iraq since extremists attacked.
CNN joins the fight to end modern-day slavery by shining a spotlight on its horrors and highlighting success stories.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
July 11, 2014 -- Updated 1634 GMT (0034 HKT)
People walk with their luggage at the Maiquetia international airport that serves Caracas on July 3, 2014. A survey by pollster Datanalisis revealed that 25% of the population surveyed (end of May) has at least one family member or friend who has emigrated from the country. AFP PHOTO/Leo RAMIREZ (Photo credit should read LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Plane passengers are used to paying additional fees, but one airport in Venezuela is now charging for the ultimate hidden extra -- air.
ADVERTISEMENT