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Suspected wife killer on U.S. Marshals 'Most Wanted' list arrested in Italy

By CNN Staff
March 15, 2013 -- Updated 2242 GMT (0642 HKT)
The U.S. Marshals Service added Miguel Torres to its most wanted list in June 2011.
The U.S. Marshals Service added Miguel Torres to its most wanted list in June 2011.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Authorities allege Miguel Torres ambushed his wife in 2005, then killed her
  • He is charged with murder, but authorities hadn't been able to track him down
  • The U.S. Marshals Service put Torres on its 15 Most Wanted list in 2011
  • Torres is arrested in Italy, where he was believed to be living and using an alias

(CNN) -- Seven and a half years after allegedly fatally shooting his wife in the back and head, a now 42-year-old man is in custody -- in Italy, according to the U.S. Marshals Service.

Italian authorities arrested Miguel Torres on Friday at his home in the northern city of Bologna, the U.S. Marshals Service announced. His capture came after the U.S. Marshals Service, working with Italian law enforcement and U.S. Diplomatic Security Service, learned that he was living in Italy under the alias Rene Rondon.

After she moved out of his home, Torres' wife sought and got a restraining order against him in September 2005, according to the Marshals Service.

Later that month, Torres allegedly hid in the backseat of his wife's car -- getting in with a spare key he had -- waiting for her to get out of work in Reading, Pennsylvania. He got out after she spotted him and she ran, with Torres allegedly first shooting her in the back before walking up to her and shooting her in the head, the U.S. Marshals Service said.

According to the Berks County Sheriff, Torres -- who was a Reading resident at the time of the incident -- is charged with murder.

In June 2011, the U.S. Marshals Service added Torres to its list of 15 Most Wanted individuals.

"This final act of aggression was in keeping with his history of violence and abuse and we will do our best to swiftly bring him to justice," Geoffrey Shank, then the federal agency's acting assistant director of investigative operations, said at the time.

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