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Anthony Bourdain: Human race is 'essentially good'

By Anthony Bourdain, CNN
April 16, 2013 -- Updated 0956 GMT (1756 HKT)
Anthony Bourdain reads the paper next to a local market in Yangon, Myanmar.
Anthony Bourdain reads the paper next to a local market in Yangon, Myanmar.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown" takes you across the globe to exotic destinations
  • The CNN personality will share his unique perspective and insights while traveling the world
  • Bourdain: "People, wherever they live, are not statistics. They are not abstractions"
  • He hopes to show "what people are like at the table, at home, in their businesses, at play"

World-renowned chef, best-selling author and Emmy winning television personality Anthony Bourdain is the host of "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown," CNN's new showcase for coverage of food and travel. The series is shot entirely on location. "Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown" premieres Sunday, April 14, at 9 p.m. ET

(CNN) -- Before I set out to travel this world, 12 years ago, I used to believe that the human race as a whole was basically a few steps above wolves.

That given the slightest change in circumstances, we would all, sooner or later, tear each other to shreds. That we were, at root, self-interested, cowardly, envious and potentially dangerous in groups. I have since come to believe -- after many meals with many different people in many, many different places -- that though there is no shortage of people who would do us harm, we are essentially good.

That the world is, in fact, filled with mostly good and decent people who are simply doing the best they can. Everybody, it turns out, is proud of their food (when they have it). They enjoy sharing it with others (if they can). They love their children. They like a good joke. Sitting at the table has allowed me a privileged perspective and access that others, looking principally for "the story," do not, I believe, always get.

People feel free, with a goofy American guy who has expressed interest only in their food and what they do for fun, to tell stories about themselves -- to let their guard down, to be and to reveal, on occasion, their truest selves.

Nick Brigden is an Emmy award-nominated editor and director. He lives in New York with his wife, Carrie, and their dog, Honey Paw. Nick Brigden is an Emmy award-nominated editor and director. He lives in New York with his wife, Carrie, and their dog, Honey Paw.
Nick Brigden: Editor
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Meet the crew Meet the crew
Anthony Bourdain previews new CNN show
Human-powered Ferris wheel
Anthony Bourdain in the hot seat

I am not a journalist. I am not a foreign correspondent. I am, at best, an essayist and enthusiast. An amateur. I hope to show you what people are like at the table, at home, in their businesses, at play. And when and if, later, you read about or see the places I've been on the news, you'll have a better idea of who, exactly, lives there.

"Parts Unknown" is supposed to be about food, culture and travel -- as seen through the prism of food. We will learn along with you. When we look at familiar locations, we hope to look at them from a lesser-known perspective, examine aspects unfamiliar to most.

People, wherever they live, are not statistics. They are not abstractions.

Bad things happen to good people all the time. When they do, hopefully, you'll have a better idea who, and what, on a human scale, is involved.

I'm not saying that sitting down with people and sharing a plate is the answer to world peace. Not by a long shot.

But it can't hurt.

Anthony Bourdain
Hotel El Minzah, Tangier

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