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A quick glance at the long day of terror in Boston

By Faith Karimi, CNN
April 20, 2013 -- Updated 1023 GMT (1823 HKT)

(CNN) -- After a 24-hour manhunt that paralyzed the Boston area, authorities captured the suspect in this week's marathon bombings. In the aftermath, his older brother -- also a suspect -- lay dead, and so did a police officer believed killed by the two.

A quick glance at the five major developments.

CAPTURED

Police arrested Dzhokar Tsarnaev, 19, after a long night of terror and mayhem in the Boston area.

Social media offers clues about brothers
Legal rights of the suspect bomber
Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is detained by officers on Friday, April 19. After a car chase and shootout with police, one suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was shot and killed by police early Friday, and his brother and second suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was taken into custody Friday night. The two men are suspects in the bombings at the Boston Marathon on April 15, that killed three people and wounded at least 170. See all photography related to the Boston bombings. Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is detained by officers on Friday, April 19. After a car chase and shootout with police, one suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was shot and killed by police early Friday, and his brother and second suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was taken into custody Friday night. The two men are suspects in the bombings at the Boston Marathon on April 15, that killed three people and wounded at least 170. See all photography related to the Boston bombings.
Manhunt for Boston bombers
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Photos: Manhunt for Boston bombers Photos: Manhunt for Boston bombers
A man removes a sign hanging from the Lennox Hotel along Boylston Street after the street reopened to the public for the first time since the Boston Marathon bombings in Boston on Wednesday, April 24. The city is trying to return to normal less than a week after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, shocking the nation and leaving the city on edge. See all photography relating to the Boston bombings. A man removes a sign hanging from the Lennox Hotel along Boylston Street after the street reopened to the public for the first time since the Boston Marathon bombings in Boston on Wednesday, April 24. The city is trying to return to normal less than a week after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, shocking the nation and leaving the city on edge. See all photography relating to the Boston bombings.
Boston celebrates, seeks return to normal
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Witness: We heard explosions, gunshots

The teen bombing suspect suffered serious injuries and is hospitalized at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a hospital spokesman said.

The standoff and subsequent arrest Friday night came just minutes after frustrated authorities indicated during a news conference that a manhunt for the suspect came up empty.

HOW IT STARTED

Police responded Thursday night to a call on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus, where university police officer Sean Collier, 26, was fatally shot. Police believe the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, Dzhokar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were responsible for the shooting.

Soon after the alleged attack, the two suspects hijacked a car at gunpoint in Cambridge, taking the driver hostage. They later released the hostage at a gas station, and as a police chase ensued, the suspects hurled a grenade and pipe bombs at officers in hot pursuit.

A NIGHT OF MAYHEM

Authorities used the tracking device in the carjacked Mercedes to track the brothers to Watertown.

However, the suspects were determined not to go down without a fight. Explosives and gunfire rang into the night, sending residents scattering.

Officers fired back, striking a man later identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26.

He was suspect No. 1 in the Boston Marathon bombings that killed three people and injured about 180 others.

He was wearing explosives when his body was recovered, a source said.

The younger brother -- suspect No. 2 -- fled into the night.

Authorities asked Boston-area residents not to leave their homes Friday as they went door-to-door searching for the suspect. They shut down transportation services and asked residents to stay home as a massive manhunt ensued.

About 6 p.m., a frustrated Gov. Deval Patrick lifted the lockdown and said mass transit service has resumed. He urged residents to be vigilant because the suspect was still on the run.

SUSPECT CORNERED

Not too long after the lockdown was lifted, there was some good news.

Massachusetts authorities arrested the teen after a resident found him in his boat in Watertown. The man saw blood on his boat in the backyard, and the suspect bleeding under a tarp.

Police converged on the scene and asked the teen to surrender.

"Come out on your own terms. We know you're in there. Come out with your hands up," officers said.

Police and the suspect exchanged gunfire.

He was found in a boat in the yard of a home close to where he and his older brother engaged in a shootout with police nearly 24 hours earlier.

"We've closed an important chapter in this tragedy," President Barack Obama said after the arrest.

2 BROTHERS, 2 ENDINGS

The brothers came from the Russian Caucasus region and moved to Kazakhstan at a young age before coming to the United States several years ago. The younger brother was 8 years old at the time, according to relatives. He came to the United States as a tourist with his family in the early 2000s and later asked for asylum. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen last year, according to a federal official.

He attended the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth.

The older brother was not a citizen, but was lawfully in the United States as a green-card holder. He studied engineering at Bunker Hill Community College just outside Boston, but had taken the year off to train as a boxer, sources told CNN.

The family of Katherine Russell, his wife, issued a letter saying their "hearts are sickened by the knowledge of the horror he has inflicted."

FBI agents interviewed the older brother two years ago at the request of a foreign government, but found no connection with terror groups. An agency official declined to to name the foreign government, but said the FBI took various investigative steps, including looking at his travel history and checking databases for derogatory information.

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