Fashion designer John Galliano to teach at New York school

John Galliano is pictured at London Fashion Week on September 18, 2010.

Story highlights

  • Fashion designer John Galliano will teach at Parsons The New School for Design
  • Former chief designer for Christian Dior was convicted in France for anti-Semitic remarks
  • Galliano attended drug and alcohol rehab, apologized for comments
  • "We should just move on," says Anti-Defamation League's national director

Controversial fashion designer John Galliano -- fired and convicted over anti-Semitic comments in 2011 -- is heading to a New York design classroom this spring.

The former chief designer for Christian Dior will teach a three-day master class at Parsons The New School for Design.

The class will give Parsons students an opportunity to learn from "an immensely talented designer," according to a statement from the school.

Galliano was fired from the fashion giant in March 2011 after making anti-Semitic remarks in Paris. Later that year, a French court found him guilty for making public insults based on origin, religious affiliation, race or ethnicity.

"I love Hitler," Galliano said in a video obtained by Britain's Sun newspaper. "Your mother, your forefathers would be f---ing gassed and f---ing dead."

2011: Galliano 'I love Hitler' rant
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Galliano guilty in anti-Semitism trial
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In his trial, he said that alcohol and drugs were major factors, which he realized during a stint in rehab after he was fired. Galliano apologized, saying, "Anti-Semitism and racism have no part in our society."

He added: "I only have myself to blame and I know that I must face up to my own failures and that I must work hard to gain people's understanding and compassion."

Abraham Foxman, national director for the Anti-Defamation League, said Tuesday in a statement, "I think it's time that John Galliano be evaluated on his skills."

"He apologized, he repaired, he reached out. We should just move on. I think that's the fair thing to do. I'm delighted for Parsons and I'm delighted for him," Foxman added.

Parsons acknowledged the controversy in its statement, saying, "We believe that over the past two years, Mr. Galliano has demonstrated a serious intent to make amends for his past actions."