Skip to main content

Another pre-election bombing in Pakistan leaves 6 dead

From Aliza Kassim, CNN
April 29, 2013 -- Updated 0921 GMT (1721 HKT)
Pakistani paramedics treat an injured man following a bomb blast in Peshawar on April 29, 2013.
Pakistani paramedics treat an injured man following a bomb blast in Peshawar on April 29, 2013.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • No one immediately claimed responsibility for the Monday attack
  • The Pakistani Taliban took responsibility for blasts that killed 8 on Sunday
  • The group says it is targeting candidates in the upcoming democratic election
  • Pakistani Taliban: "We are not in favor of democracy. Democracy is for Jews and Christians"

(CNN) -- A man in a motorcycle detonated explosives Monday near a police van in northwest Pakistan, killing at least six people and wounding more than 30, police said.

The explosion took place on a busy road in the city of Peshawar. No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.

It was the latest deadly blast to rattle the country ahead of national elections next month.

Read more: The myth of an Arab Spring in Pakistan

On Sunday, at least eight people were killed as the Pakistani Taliban continued to attack candidates in that country's upcoming vote, police said.

In a statement to CNN, the Pakistani Taliban took responsibility for bombings at the offices of candidates in Peshawar and the Orakzai Agency.

Both attacks Sunday targeted independent candidates.

The Taliban said it targeted secular candidates, but many parties have been hit by the increasing violence.

"A man cannot be secular and Muslim at a time. These are two different doctrines in nature," the statement said.

The elections in May will mark the first time in Pakistan's history that one democratically elected government will give way to another.

Read more: Will democracy be derailed in Pakistan?

The nation has experienced three military coups, been ruled by generals for half its life, and it remains mired in near-constant political turmoil.

Pakistani Taliban leader Hakimullah Mehsud has told Pakistanis to stay away from the elections.

"We are not in favor of democracy. Democracy is for Jews and Christians," he said in recent propaganda video.

"We want the implementation of Sharia (law), and for that jihad is necessary," he added.

The Pakistani Taliban are closely linked with the group's namesake in Afghanistan as well as with al Qaeda. It shares a similar religious extremist ideology, but is a distinct group that wants to replace the Pakistani government with an Islamist one.

Ali Dayan Hasan, the Pakistan director at Human Rights Watch, called for the country's interim government to provide candidates with as much protection as possible so they can campaign freely without fear.

"Since the end of military rule in 2008, Pakistan's political parties have displayed an impressive commitment to cementing democratic and constitutional rule," Hasan said.

"It would be a tragedy if a combination of militancy and the government's failure to ensure security compromises the election and sets back Pakistan's progress towards regular, free and fair elections in which all Pakistanis can participate."

CNN's Nic Robertson contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
December 24, 2014 -- Updated 0254 GMT (1054 HKT)
A decade on from devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the Red Cross' Matthias Schmale says that the lessons learned have made us safer.
December 24, 2014 -- Updated 0024 GMT (0824 HKT)
As soon as word broke that "The Interview" will hit some theaters, celebrations erupted across social media -- including from the stars of the film.
December 23, 2014 -- Updated 1844 GMT (0244 HKT)
Did a rogue hacker -- or the U.S. government -- cut the cord for the regime's Internet?
December 24, 2014 -- Updated 0106 GMT (0906 HKT)
Monaco's newborn royals, Princess Gabriella and Crown Prince Jacques Honore Rainier, posed for their first official photos with their parents.
December 23, 2014 -- Updated 1706 GMT (0106 HKT)
Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with inventing the world wide web, gives a speech on April 18, 2012 in Lyon, central France, during the World Wide Web 2012 international conference on April 18, 2012 in Lyon.
What's next for the Internet? Acclaimed scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee shares his insights.
December 23, 2014 -- Updated 0822 GMT (1622 HKT)
The United States and North Korea have long been locked in a bitter cycle of escalating and deescalating tensions. But the current cyber conflict may be especially hard to predict.
December 22, 2014 -- Updated 2100 GMT (0500 HKT)
A chilling video shows Boko Haram executing dozens of non-Muslims.
December 22, 2014 -- Updated 1134 GMT (1934 HKT)
New planes, new flight tests ... but will we get cheaper airfares?
December 21, 2014 -- Updated 1746 GMT (0146 HKT)
The killing of two cops could not have happened at a worse time for a city embroiled in a public battle over police-community relations, Errol Louis says.
December 22, 2014 -- Updated 0251 GMT (1051 HKT)
The gateway to Japan's capital, Tokyo Station, is celebrating its centennial this month -- and it has never looked better.
December 20, 2014 -- Updated 1621 GMT (0021 HKT)
Unicef has warned that more than 1.7 million children in conflict-torn areas of eastern Ukraine face an "extremely serious" situation.
December 22, 2014 -- Updated 1701 GMT (0101 HKT)
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT