Skip to main content

Dozens dead in Sudan mine collapse

By Isma'il Kushkush, for CNN
May 2, 2013 -- Updated 1621 GMT (0021 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Darfur Regional Authority official says 52 bodies have been recovered
  • The collapse happened Monday in Sudan's north Darfur region
  • Many people are still unaccounted for, the official says

Khartoum, Sudan (CNN) -- A gold mine in the western Sudanese state of Darfur collapsed this week, killing scores of people and leaving many still unaccounted for, an official says.

"Fifty-two bodies have so far been recovered," said Yaqub al-Damuki, minister of information for the Darfur Regional Authority. "But the search is still going on."

State-run Ashorooq TV, quoting a local official, reported Thursday that the collapse killed more than 60 people. It said the accident occurred after people dug in dangerous areas of the mine.

The mine collapsed in the Jebel Amir area of the town of El Serief in north Darfur on Monday, an eyewitness said. Fighting between two Arab tribes over land and mining rights in the area this year has killed hundreds of people.

The violence in the area has also sent thousands into camps for internally displaced people.

Independent gold mining has seen a boom in Sudan in the past few years, as the country looks for new sources to boost its economy. In 2011, South Sudan separated from Sudan, taking with it most of the country's oil revenue.

One eyewitness said that the mines in the area were not well organized.

"The mining tunnels were very close to each other," Hamid al-Tijani said, adding that area mines "were supposed to be closed and then reorganized."

"But that did not happen."

The death toll, al-Tijani said, could get higher.

"Anyone not accounted for is presumed dead," he said.

Authorities ordered the mine shut until calm is restored in the region.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
August 21, 2014 -- Updated 1720 GMT (0120 HKT)
The beheading of U.S. journalist James Foley by ISIS militants brings into focus the risks faced by reporters in conflict zones.
August 21, 2014 -- Updated 1224 GMT (2024 HKT)
About $35,000 was taken from the bank accounts of four passengers on board Flight 370.
August 21, 2014 -- Updated 1353 GMT (2153 HKT)
Five survivors of acid attacks capture India's attention with a "ground breaking" photo shoot.
August 20, 2014 -- Updated 1732 GMT (0132 HKT)
The execution of a journalist by a British-accented jihadist is a direct challenge to the international community. It's time for the U.S. to move, writes Frida Ghitis.
August 20, 2014 -- Updated 1219 GMT (2019 HKT)
In an exclusive CNN interview, Lance Armstrong admits to having a "f**k you" attitude.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 0858 GMT (1658 HKT)
Summer isn't over yet. These new hotels are keeping it alive and fresh.
August 20, 2014 -- Updated 1535 GMT (2335 HKT)
You've seen her turn on the catwalk, but her income might make your head spin.
August 20, 2014 -- Updated 0036 GMT (0836 HKT)
The pain that Michael Brown's parents are going through is something Sybrina Fulton can relate to. She, too, lost a son in a controversial shooting.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 0904 GMT (1704 HKT)
19-year-old Udi Segal explains why he won't join the country's military.
Drinkers guzzled an incredible 10.3 billion liters of this brand in 2013, making it the world's No.1 beer. And you may have never heard of it.
CNN joins the fight to end modern-day slavery by shining a spotlight on its horrors and highlighting success stories.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT