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This mask gives you superhuman abilities

It may bear an ominous similarity to the head-gear worn by Iron Man, but this cool piece of 3D-printed equipment is one half of a hi-tech vision and audio system that aims to sharpen how we see and hear the world around us. It may bear an ominous similarity to the head-gear worn by Iron Man, but this cool piece of 3D-printed equipment is one half of a hi-tech vision and audio system that aims to sharpen how we see and hear the world around us.
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Extending human capabilities
Delving into detail
Hearing one voice among many
On the spot sports analysis
Helping focus
Creating superhumans
Mixing digital technology with the human body
Early stage development
Hearing a voice inside the head
Wearable tech
Creating visual effects in real time
Illusion of depth
Eidos superhuman mask
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Students at the Royal College of Art have created masks that can give enhanced sight and hearing
  • First mask uses a microphone to isolate a specific sound in a noisy environment
  • The other, worn over the eyes, can apply visual effects seen by the wearer in real time

(CNN) -- Fans of "Iron Man," take notice: A group of students at the Royal College of Art in London have created two masks that can give you superhuman sight and hearing.

The first prototype covers the wearer's ears, mouth and nose and uses a directional microphone to give him the ability to hear an isolated sound in a noisy environment. For example, you could target a person in a crowd and clearly hear his words without the surrounding noise.

The other prototype is worn over one's eyes. A camera captures video and sends it to a computer, which can apply a set of effects to it in real-time and send it back to the wearer. One can, for example, use it to see movement patterns, similar to the effects of long-exposure photography.

Watch: Wearable tech tracks your life

We are used to controlling the world around us to find the settings that suit us best. What if we had the same control over our senses?
Project Eidos team

The team behind project Eidos — Tim Bouckley, Millie Clive-Smith, Mi Eun Kim and Yuta Sugawara — see many possible applications of this technology. For example, one could use the visual mask it to analyze movement and technique in sports. In another example, concert-goers could use the hearing mask to focus on a certain performer at a concert.

"We are used to controlling the world around us to find the settings that suit us best. But while technology advances to aid this, our physical bodies remain the same. What if we had the same control over our senses? If we could adjust them in real time, what experiences would this make possible,' they ask.

Read more: Digital tattoos, mind reading headphones

Though the Eidos prototypes are relatively simple, the ideas behind the project are interesting. With wearable tech being the talk of the town as of late, one has to wonder if Google Glass, for example, could be paired with visual or auditory augmentation technology to "improve" your senses.

What superhuman abilities would you like to gain from wearable tech? Share your ideas in the comments.

© 2013 MASHABLE.com. All rights reserved.

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