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UEFA to monitor London security ahead of Champions League final

The Champions League final is being staged in London where security has come into focus ahead of the big match

Story highlights

  • UEFA to monitor security for Saturday's Champions League final
  • Security in London is in focus following the murder of a solider in London
  • UEFA is confident there will be a positive atmosphere inside and outside Wembley Stadium
  • Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund play each other in an all-German final

European football's governing body UEFA says it will continue to monitor security ahead of Saturday's Champions League final in London.

The British government held an emergency meeting on Thursday following the daylight murder of a British soldier in the capital the previous day.

Owned by the English Football Association, Wembley is hosting the final of the prestigious European club competition for the second time in two years, but on match day it is UEFA which assumes responsibility for the stadium in north London.

UEFA said it was "confident" that the all-German final between Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund would not be affected by wider events in London.

"We obviously have a lot of security measures in place," a UEFA spokeswoman told CNN. "We are confident they will guarantee there is a positive atmosphere in the city as well as inside the stadium.

"As for each final we contact the [local] police and security is in their hands. We will of course be monitoring the situation.

    "Each time we hold a final we discuss various security matters [with the venues] where we discuss the number of stewards, security and police officers required."

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    London's Metropolitan Police Service has not changed the "threat level" for the final since the murder, though the police will continue to keep their plans under constant review.

    "In light of events in Woolwich we have looked at our policing plan for the Champions League final," said Chief Superintendent Julia Pendry, who is heading up the policing operation for the final, said in a statement.

    "We would like to reassure travelling fans and visitors to London that there is nothing at this stage to suggest any threat to this event and an appropriate policing response will be in place to ensure the safety and security of those who attend the event.

    "We are working closely with British Transport Police and our other emergency service partners and as always our plans are flexible and kept under continuous review."

    Firearms officers are used as a response service by the Metropolitan Police Service and would not routinely be on patrol at events such as Champions League finals.

    Security in London has come under renewed focus after a British soldier was brutally killed close to barracks in Woolwich, south London on Wednesday.

    There has been increased security at army bases around London amid fears of additional attacks, but Prime Minister David Cameron urged people to "go about their normal lives."

    Borussia Dortmund has not changed its advice to fans traveling to London ahead of Saturday's match.

    Read: Dortmund's Gotze out of Champions League final

    The club has sold all of its allocation of 25,000 tickets for the London final after 500,000 had applied for tickets, though Dortmund did not know how many fans were planning to travel to the UK without a ticket for the match.

    Bayern Munich was not immediately available for comment.

    The capacity of Wembley Stadium for the match will be 86,000, with each team receiving 25,000 seats with 9,000 going on sale to fans around the world.

    Wembley will be open to fans from 1630 (BST) ahead of the Champions League finale.

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