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Yahoo pushes all users to new e-mail

Doug Gross, CNN
The Yahoo logo is displayed on a flag flying at the company's headquarters in Sunnyvale, California, on April 16, 2013.
The Yahoo logo is displayed on a flag flying at the company's headquarters in Sunnyvale, California, on April 16, 2013.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Yahoo e-mail users must upgrade to the company's new version
  • Yahoo had announced overhaul to its e-mail service in December
  • Upgrade included thumbnails for attachments, new mobile features

Editor's note: Doug Gross covers consumer technology and the Web for CNN Tech. Follow him on Twitter or add him to your Circles on Google+.

(CNN) -- For Yahoo users who prefer old-school e-mailing, your grace period is over.

Monday is the first day that users will be required to upgrade to the latest version of of Yahoo's e-mail service, which according to various assessments is either the second or third most popular on the Web.

This change has been in the works since December, when Yahoo, under the guidance of new CEO Marissa Mayer, announced a major and long-awaited overhaul of e-mail.

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer's photo spread in Vogue magazine has proven controversial, with some saying it detracts from the 3,000-word article that focuses on her successes and vision in a male-dominated tech world. The profile describes Mayer as an "unusually stylish geek." Take a look at other photos of her through the years. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer's photo spread in Vogue magazine has proven controversial, with some saying it detracts from the 3,000-word article that focuses on her successes and vision in a male-dominated tech world. The profile describes Mayer as an "unusually stylish geek." Take a look at other photos of her through the years.
Marissa Mayer: Proud geek
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Marissa Mayer: Proud geek Marissa Mayer: Proud geek
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"You've told us loud and clear that you want fewer distractions when it comes to e-mail," Mayer said at the time. "You want to quickly login, communicate, and get on with your day. And we've listened."

The upgrades were made available for Web, Windows 8, iPhone/iPod touch and Android. But as is always the case when faced with change, some folks were more comfortable with older versions, including "Yahoo Classic," and were given until Monday to switch.

In a Yahoo Help post the company noted that upgrading requires users to agree to terms including "automated content scanning." That's technology similar to that used by Google with Gmail, which uses search algorithms, not real people, to read through the content of people's messages in order to target relevant advertising -- as well as other features -- to them.

Users may opt out of that feature by changing their settings.

The changes to the latest version of Yahoo Mail include removing some of the boxes that filled the page in the Web version and offering thumbnail images of attachments, presumably to help avoid clicking on scams, spam and other unwanted content.

On Mail for iPhone, users can select multiple messages and swipe to delete, highlight or file them away. The Android app was upgraded to, among other things, put less drain on battery life.

Still don't like the latest version? The Yahoo help post offers options for disgruntled users, including how to download your content and access it through another client and how to delete your account.

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