Skip to main content

South Korean sensation Inbee Park sets sights on 'grand slam'

July 1, 2013 -- Updated 2243 GMT (0643 HKT)
South Korea's Inbee Park is in line to become the first golfer to win four professional majors in one year.
South Korea's Inbee Park is in line to become the first golfer to win four professional majors in one year.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Inbee Park believes fourth major would constitute a 'grand slam'
  • South Korean has won U.S. Women's Open, Kraft Nabisco and Wegmans LPGA this year
  • Next available title is August's British Open at St Andrews

(CNN) -- South Korea's Inbee Park says she will consider it a grand slam if she wins next month's British Open.

A day after becoming the first player since Ben Hogan in 1953 to win the first three majors of the season, Park is not concerned by the presence of five women's majors this year.

"Yes, of course, I think so," Sunday's U.S. Women's Open winner told CNN World Sport when asked if success at the British Open would constitute a grand slam.

"Even though there are five majors, I think winning four is very, very good."

Read: Inbee Park makes history at Southampton

Recreating golf's most iconic photograph
Tour stars on God and golf
A golf coaching dynasty
Golf's billion dollar pioneer

This is the first year in which there will be five majors on the schedule, after the Evian Championship in France was elevated in status.

By winning at the Sebonack course in Southampton by four strokes, the World No. 1 put herself in contention to become the first golfer -- male or female -- to win four major championships in a season.

Having won the Kraft Nabisco Championship in April and the Wegmans LPGA Championship earlier this month, she has already matched the record of the legendary Babe Zaharias, who won three majors in 1950.

When Zaharias achieved her milestone only three majors were on the schedule, while Mickey Wright (1961) and Pat Bradley (1986) are the only other players in LPGA history to win three majors in a season -- but the latter two women failed to achieve consecutive wins.

Park, 24, says she was well aware of the history coming her way as she drove off on Sunday.

"I felt the pressure because I was going for three in a row and everything that was going on was very crazy -- but once I got on the course, I was very calm," she said.

"It's crazy what I've just done. I never would have thought I would have done that ever.

"I am achieving things I never thought I would get, but I am getting there one step at a time. I don't know how far I will go."

Winning a fifth major in the season, with the Evian Championship taking place in September, would represent a milestone in the history of golf.

Although an arguably slim prospect, Park's record in her last 24 starts -- with eight victories coming on top of five runner-up finishes -- suggests she is likely to be in contention at both events.

The Seoul-born golfer won her first major in 2008 at the U.S. Women's Open but had to wait until earlier this year to add that success.

South Koreans have won seven of the last nine major LPGA titles and Park is hopeful she can continue that remarkable run at St Andrews in August.

"I played very well at the British Open in the last couple of years so I am really looking forward to going there," added a woman who turned professional in 2006.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Bubba Watson is the Masters king, but can he win a major away from Augusta? Living Golf's Shane O'Donoghue has the lowdown.
April 15, 2014 -- Updated 1412 GMT (2212 HKT)
Arnold Palmer
Arnold Palmer won his first major at Augusta, played there with the U.S. President and made a record 50 consecutive Masters appearances.
April 10, 2014 -- Updated 1202 GMT (2002 HKT)
He is remembered for designing one of the world's most famous golf courses, but the man behind Augusta died pleading to be paid.
April 9, 2014 -- Updated 1426 GMT (2226 HKT)
Will Phil Mickelson win a fourth green jacket? Can Europe end its long Masters wait? Or will Adam Scott emulate the absent Tiger Woods?
April 10, 2014 -- Updated 1004 GMT (1804 HKT)
Take a trip around Augusta. From Eisenhower's toppled tree to the fiendishly-difficult Amen Corner, the Masters' home venue has it all.
April 8, 2014 -- Updated 1204 GMT (2004 HKT)
He's been mistaken for Tiger Woods' ball-boy, but that won't be the case when amateur star Matt Fitzpatrick tees off at the Masters.
April 4, 2014 -- Updated 1228 GMT (2028 HKT)
2012 Masters Champion Bubba Watson shows us how to hit the long ball.
April 3, 2014 -- Updated 1827 GMT (0227 HKT)
CNN's Shane O'Donoghue meets Billy Payne -- the chairman of Augusta National Golf Club.
April 3, 2014 -- Updated 1739 GMT (0139 HKT)
Shane O'Donoghue meets Ben Crenshaw who won his first of two Masters thirty years ago this month.
April 3, 2014 -- Updated 1803 GMT (0203 HKT)
CNN's Shane O'Donoghue walks in the footsteps of the famous British golf course architect.
March 27, 2014 -- Updated 1300 GMT (2100 HKT)
They carry a bag for a living but these men can bring home six-figure incomes. Welcome to the world of a caddy.
CNN's Alex Thomas welcomes golf opening itself up to women, but questions the motives behind the decision.
ADVERTISEMENT