Skip to main content

French rail chief blames train derailment on faulty switch part

By Saskya Vandoorne and Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
July 15, 2013 -- Updated 1709 GMT (0109 HKT)
Rescuers work on the site of a train accident in the railway station of Bretigny-sur-Orge, on Friday, July 12 near Paris. The train was passing through the station but was not scheduled to stop there, according to Guillaume Pepy, president of the French national railway company, SNCF. Rescuers work on the site of a train accident in the railway station of Bretigny-sur-Orge, on Friday, July 12 near Paris. The train was passing through the station but was not scheduled to stop there, according to Guillaume Pepy, president of the French national railway company, SNCF.
HIDE CAPTION
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
French train derails
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Death toll stands definitively at six, government official says
  • French rail company chief says a part disconnected from the switching mechanism
  • 22 others were injured in the derailment south of Paris
  • French President Francois Hollande visited the scene of the derailment

(CNN) -- A fatal train derailment south of Paris was caused by a part disconnecting from the switching mechanism on the tracks, the head of the French national railway company said Saturday.

Six people were killed and 22 others injured late Friday afternoon when four cars of the train, a regional service bound for the city of Limoges, went off the track at Bretigny-sur-Orge station.

On Saturday night, officials said the death toll was definitive.

"We are now sure that there are no additional victims," said Michel Fuzeau, the prefect for the Essonne department. A train car that was lying on its side at the station was lifted up and then inspected by firefighters and police, who did not find any additional victims, Fuzeau said.

At least six dead in French train wreck
Passenger describes France train wreck
Many casualties in French train wreck

Various government officials and authorities had earlier given conflicting death tolls.

A moment's silence for the victims was to be observed at noon Saturday at rail stations and on trains across France, said Guillaume Pepy, president of the railway company SNCF.

Services have been suspended on the line where the accident occurred, Pepy said.

Footage from the station Friday showed a scene of devastation, with the derailed train cars twisted and crumpled across the platform and track. Rescue workers searched the wreckage for the dead and injured.

French President Francois Hollande visited the scene of the derailment Friday, when he praised the work of emergency responders.

Hollande, who said he'd traveled on the route before, announced three investigations: a judicial inquiry, an internal inquiry within SNCF and an inquiry that will be handled by the country's transport ministry.

The train was carrying about 370 people at the time of the incident.

Alain Krakovitch, responsible for rail service safety and quality at SNCF, told BFMTV that the train was traveling at a normal speed when it reached Bretigny-sur-Orge about 20 minutes after its departure from Paris Austerlitz.

The train and station platform were busy with travelers on what is a holiday weekend in France.

A passenger in the first car of the train, whose name was given only as Laurent, told BFMTV he had felt a powerful shaking, lasting 10 to 15 seconds. Smoke was everywhere, he said.

His rail car remained on the track, but the passengers could see the derailed cars behind, he said.

Officials praised the swift reaction of the train's driver, which meant other train services were halted before they could hit the wreckage.

"The train driver had an extraordinary reflex in immediately signaling the alert," Transport Minister Frederic Cuvillier told BFMTV.

Freight train hits truck and derails in Maryland

Death toll in Canadian train disaster at 35

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 2001 GMT (0401 HKT)
The U.S. has promised to supply and train "acceptable" rebels in Syria to counter ISIS. But who are they and are can the strategy work?
September 23, 2014 -- Updated 0257 GMT (1057 HKT)
Do the Chinese really like to mix their Bordeaux with Coca-Cola?
September 23, 2014 -- Updated 1034 GMT (1834 HKT)
Al Qaeda's new Syrian branch, Khorasan, is seeking new ways to attack America and Europe, with a top U.S. intelligence official saying it has "aspirations for attacks on the homeland."
September 23, 2014 -- Updated 0039 GMT (0839 HKT)
Branded an "extremist" by China's state-run media, Joshua Wong isn't even old enough to drive.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 0655 GMT (1455 HKT)
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi surprised political pundits with his rapid rise to power. CNN meets the man behind the enigma.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 1144 GMT (1944 HKT)
Liverpool's Italian forward Mario Balotelli reacts during the UEFA Champions League Group B match between Liverpool and Ludogorets Razgrad at the Anfield stadium in Liverpool on September 16, 2014.
British police launched an investigation into abusive tweets sent to Liverpool striker Mario Balotelli.
September 21, 2014 -- Updated 2344 GMT (0744 HKT)
A woman who was texting her husband before he was killed reflects on the Westgate attack.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 1554 GMT (2354 HKT)
The real secret to a faster commute has been with us all along -- the bus.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 1316 GMT (2116 HKT)
13 brands retained their Top 20 status from last year, according to an annual survey.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 1549 GMT (2349 HKT)
Think your new tattoo is cool? Look at how our ancestors did it and think again.
September 22, 2014 -- Updated 1100 GMT (1900 HKT)
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT