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Judge won't throw out 2 charges against Manning

By Larry Shaughnessy, CNN Pentagon Producer
July 18, 2013 -- Updated 1528 GMT (2328 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Among the charges is the most serious against Pfc. Bradley Manning: aiding the enemy
  • Closing arguments in the case against Manning are still to come
  • He is charged in the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history

Fort Meade, Maryland (CNN) -- A military judge overseeing the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning on Thursday denied defense motions seeking to throw out two charges against him.

One of the charges is the most serious that Manning faces: aiding the enemy, which would carry a maximum penalty of life in prison.

The judge, Col. Denise Lind, said the government had met the burden to present evidence that the crimes had been committed.

Prosecutors: Manning 'craved' notoriety

Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, is charged with the largest leak of classified documents in U.S. history, accused of handing over a trove of documents and other information to WikiLeaks, an organization that facilitates the anonymous leaking of secret information through its website.

2012: Bradley Manning claims abuse

Closing arguments are still to come.

Manning's lawyers asked Lind to toss the two charges on July 8.

Manning already has pleaded guilty to nearly a dozen lesser charges that carry a sentence of up to 20 years in prison.

Manning admits leaking classified material that 'upset' him to WikiLeaks

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