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When finishing is no longer the goal

By Douglas Mogle, Special to CNN
July 19, 2013 -- Updated 1112 GMT (1912 HKT)
Fit Nation participant Douglas Mogle completed the Peachtree Road Race this month.
Fit Nation participant Douglas Mogle completed the Peachtree Road Race this month.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Dougls Mogle ran a 6.2-mile race this month and had an "a-ha" moment at the finish line
  • The more progress we make towards a goal, the more difficult the goal becomes, he says
  • Mogle: We just have to keep putting one foot in front of the other

Editor's note: Douglas Mogle is one of six CNN viewers selected to be a part of the Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge program. Follow the "6-pack" on Twitter and Facebook as they train to race the Nautica Malibu Triathlon with Dr. Sanjay Gupta on September 8.

(CNN) -- This month, I accomplished another "first" in my life.

On July 4, I ran in the Peachtree Road Race, a 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) race that draws close to 60,000 racers into the heart of Atlanta on the morning of our country's birthday. Most people secure their race number months in advance. In fact, a lot of people don't get to race because they missed out in the number lottery.

I found out that I would be running the race less than 24 hours before it started.

Six months ago I couldn't run a mile without stopping to catch my breath. Six months ago I would have said, "No, thank you," when offered a number to the race. Six months ago I would have found running 6 miles to be too daunting a task.

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After running the race (and not finishing last) it became obvious to me that things have changed. I realized in that instance that finishing was no longer my goal.

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It doesn't matter if you're out of shape or unemployed. I have learned that no matter where we are in our life, we can be somewhere better in a short period of time.

Jeff Dauler says it best with his "Keep Moving Forward" movement. We just have to keep putting one foot in front of the other. No matter how small, we need to keep making progress. What I didn't realize back at the beginning of this journey is that the goal is always moving. The more progress we make, the more difficult the goal becomes. In a way, there is no end because we have to keep asking ourselves "What's next?"

I have been making progress, but I am still not where I want to be. Finishing the triathlon in September is no longer the goal -- I know I'll finish. Finishing the Peachtree Road Race and getting the T-shirt is no longer good enough -- I know I can do better next year.

It's hard to believe that I am at a point in the process where finishing is no longer good enough. It's only the beginning.

The two-month mark for the Nautica Malibu Triathlon has come and passed. The plane tickets are ordered and hotel rooms reserved. Yet, questions still remain -- questions that I've had difficulty answering throughout my time in the Fit Nation program.

Why being part of a team matters

If it's OK, I'd like to pose some of them to you. Let me know what you think in the comments below:

What do you do when finishing is no longer good enough?

Have you had that "Aha!" moment in your life?

How do you keep moving forward?

What motivates you?

How do you pass your blessing and fortunes on to others?

Do you find that the goal is always moving?

Follow @TriHardDouglas on Twitter and Facebook

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