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Google Street View goes inside the Airbus A380

Story highlights

  • An Emirates Airbus A380 is the first aircraft to be explored via Google Street View
  • Views can enter the cockpit or the bar at the back of the upper deck
  • First Class has a shower for the premium-paying passengers
  • Currently ten airlines operate the A380, with ten more with orders for the plane

Not content with climbing Mount Fuji or scaling the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, the Google Street View team has once again stretched the limits of their brief, this time with a full tour inside an Emirates Airbus A380.

Viewers can have a nose around an empty aircraft, from the escape ropes in the cockpit and the sea of economy seats on the lower deck to the well-stocked Business Class bar and the First Class showers on the top deck.

Last week the Dubai-based airline marked five years of flying the A380 and earlier this year opened a dedicated A380 concourse at Dubai airport.

First look at Dubai's new A380 concourse

"Five swift years have gone by since Emirates changed the face of air travel with this remarkable aircraft," said Tim Clark, President, Emirates Airline in a press statement. "Its popularity is now firmly rooted across our six continent network."

According to Emirates, since their first A380 flight in August 2008, the airline has loaded 4 million bread rolls onto their superjumbo planes from their Dubai base, along with more than 157,000 fresh flower displays, 538,500 baby food jars, over 1 million toothbrushes and more than 4 million teabags.

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    Emirates has a fleet of 35 A380s flying to 21 destinations, while nine other international airlines have the aircraft in their fleet. British Airways was the latest to join the A380 club last month; the UK flag-carrier will begin using the jet on its high-volume London to Los Angeles and London to Hong Kong routes from October. Ten more airlines have A380 planes on order.

    How do you pick up a 'superjumbo' A380?

    With a wingspan of 79.8 meters and length of 72 meters, the A380 is the biggest passenger jet in the sky. It can carry up 517 people and cover 15,000 kilometers (9,320 miles) in a single journey.

    Rivals Boeing launched the latest version of its largest jet, the 747-8, last year. As well as space for more passengers -- up to 467 -- the manufacturer states the new model produces 15% less emissions is 30% quieter that the old 747-400.

    Boeing's new 747-8 Intercontinental

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