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Minions carry Justin Bieber up Great Wall of China

By Karla Cripps, CNN
October 2, 2013 -- Updated 1337 GMT (2137 HKT)
Saving his energy for his fans? Justin Bieber was snapped letting his bodyguards carry him up the stairs at the Great Wall of China the day after his Beijing concert.
Saving his energy for his fans? Justin Bieber was snapped letting his bodyguards carry him up the stairs at the Great Wall of China the day after his Beijing concert.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Photos showing Justin Bieber on shoulders of bodyguards at Great Wall of China invoke mockery around globe
  • Chinese TV compares Bieber to a toddler wearing open-backed toilet-training pants
  • The singer performed in Beijing on September 29 as part of his world tour

(CNN) -- Just when you thought you might enjoy a week without any news of Justin Bieber annoying the world, along comes evidence that the most beloved/disliked self-involved teenager on the planet has broken one of the most sacred unspoken rules of travel -- don't use your bodyguards to carry you up the Great Wall of China.

More: Doh! 20 biggest travel mistakes

Photos of the seemingly able-bodied Canadian pop star hoisted on the shoulders of his minions at the iconic site were posted on the Twitter page of BelieveTourUpdates, which has been following the singer on his current world tour.

"Justin being carried by his bodyguards up the Great Wall of China today in Beijing, China (September 30th, 2013)," reads the caption of one of multiple photos of Bieber at the Wall.

Even less shocking than the Biebs' fanatical devotion to privileged behavior, the Internet nearly imploded under the weight of all the mockery and rage calling out the diva antics.

Commenters include fed-up Canadians begging the United States to adopt Bieber as one of their own.

More: How to find a great escape in the Great Wall

Netizens in the country where the scene of the alleged travel offense occurred weren't shy about expressing their thoughts either.

On Weibo, China's microblogging site, a Phoenix TV presenter posted: "The way this 'xiao pi hai' Justin Bieber hits the Great Wall is really extravagant."

"Xiao pi hai" is a word used to describe Chinese toddlers who wear toilet-training-friendly pants that expose their bare behinds.

More: Bieber hopes Anne Frank 'would have been a belieber'

These days, it's a popular phrase used to describe someone who's immature.

"It's impressive that he can sit there without a guilty conscience," Weibo user Project V commented.

"Seriously? Justin Bieber is so weak that he needs two guards to carry him on the Great Wall?" posted Taiwanese website Nownews, hopping aboard the Bieber hate-train. "Isn't climbing the Great Wall all about experiencing the breathtaking process during the hike?"

More: Germany asks Bieber to pay costs of caring for his monkey

The 19-year-old star performed in Beijing on September 29.

Next up on the Bieber world tour: stops in Dalian, China (October 2), followed by performances in Shanghai (October 5) and Tokyo (October 7).

Now, if the ambulatorily challenged, faux Canadian (someone have Donald Trump check this guy's birth certificate) gets someone to haul him up Tokyo's SkyTree, we'll be impressed.

At least with the person doing the heavy lifting.

More: Insider guide to Tokyo's SkyTree

CNN's Hiufu Wong contributed to this report.

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