Skip to main content

Minions carry Justin Bieber up Great Wall of China

By Karla Cripps, CNN
October 2, 2013 -- Updated 1337 GMT (2137 HKT)
Saving his energy for his fans? Justin Bieber was snapped letting his bodyguards carry him up the stairs at the Great Wall of China the day after his Beijing concert.
Saving his energy for his fans? Justin Bieber was snapped letting his bodyguards carry him up the stairs at the Great Wall of China the day after his Beijing concert.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Photos showing Justin Bieber on shoulders of bodyguards at Great Wall of China invoke mockery around globe
  • Chinese TV compares Bieber to a toddler wearing open-backed toilet-training pants
  • The singer performed in Beijing on September 29 as part of his world tour

(CNN) -- Just when you thought you might enjoy a week without any news of Justin Bieber annoying the world, along comes evidence that the most beloved/disliked self-involved teenager on the planet has broken one of the most sacred unspoken rules of travel -- don't use your bodyguards to carry you up the Great Wall of China.

More: Doh! 20 biggest travel mistakes

Photos of the seemingly able-bodied Canadian pop star hoisted on the shoulders of his minions at the iconic site were posted on the Twitter page of BelieveTourUpdates, which has been following the singer on his current world tour.

"Justin being carried by his bodyguards up the Great Wall of China today in Beijing, China (September 30th, 2013)," reads the caption of one of multiple photos of Bieber at the Wall.

Even less shocking than the Biebs' fanatical devotion to privileged behavior, the Internet nearly imploded under the weight of all the mockery and rage calling out the diva antics.

Commenters include fed-up Canadians begging the United States to adopt Bieber as one of their own.

More: How to find a great escape in the Great Wall

Netizens in the country where the scene of the alleged travel offense occurred weren't shy about expressing their thoughts either.

On Weibo, China's microblogging site, a Phoenix TV presenter posted: "The way this 'xiao pi hai' Justin Bieber hits the Great Wall is really extravagant."

"Xiao pi hai" is a word used to describe Chinese toddlers who wear toilet-training-friendly pants that expose their bare behinds.

More: Bieber hopes Anne Frank 'would have been a belieber'

These days, it's a popular phrase used to describe someone who's immature.

"It's impressive that he can sit there without a guilty conscience," Weibo user Project V commented.

"Seriously? Justin Bieber is so weak that he needs two guards to carry him on the Great Wall?" posted Taiwanese website Nownews, hopping aboard the Bieber hate-train. "Isn't climbing the Great Wall all about experiencing the breathtaking process during the hike?"

More: Germany asks Bieber to pay costs of caring for his monkey

The 19-year-old star performed in Beijing on September 29.

Next up on the Bieber world tour: stops in Dalian, China (October 2), followed by performances in Shanghai (October 5) and Tokyo (October 7).

Now, if the ambulatorily challenged, faux Canadian (someone have Donald Trump check this guy's birth certificate) gets someone to haul him up Tokyo's SkyTree, we'll be impressed.

At least with the person doing the heavy lifting.

More: Insider guide to Tokyo's SkyTree

CNN's Hiufu Wong contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
August 25, 2014 -- Updated 0626 GMT (1426 HKT)
the Teufelsberg or
Spooks have left their mark on a once-divided city still thought to be an espionage hotbed.
August 24, 2014 -- Updated 2206 GMT (0606 HKT)
nanjing, handicrafts
With more than 6,000 years of history, Nanjing is one of the few cities in China still practicing the country's endangered traditional crafts.
August 22, 2014 -- Updated 1610 GMT (0010 HKT)
Rock and weather collide over millennia to create natural bridges. Here are 15 of our favorites from around the world.
August 22, 2014 -- Updated 0539 GMT (1339 HKT)
A one-nun brewing operation, Sister Doris is putting Germany's women beer makers on the map. Sort of.
August 22, 2014 -- Updated 0607 GMT (1407 HKT)
From Myanmar to Mickey Mouse, Stefan Zwanzger, aka The Theme Park Guy, gives his rundown of the best.
August 22, 2014 -- Updated 1510 GMT (2310 HKT)
Four hundred years after the death of Countess Elizabeth Bathory, her murderous exploits prove a grisly attraction.
August 21, 2014 -- Updated 1250 GMT (2050 HKT)
Formed by volcanoes and steeped in a rich history of Polynesian culture, Hawaii sounds more like a place in a fantasy novel rather than an American travel oasis.
August 21, 2014 -- Updated 2356 GMT (0756 HKT)
Despite Kyoto's allure, until this year there's been a glaring absence from the city's travel scene -- a top tier, super-luxury hotel brand.
August 20, 2014 -- Updated 1151 GMT (1951 HKT)
Why global adventurer Alastair Humphreys now looks for 'microadventures' close to home.
August 13, 2014 -- Updated 1133 GMT (1933 HKT)
Don't order Corona and don't freak out when you see Jessica Alba without makeup and you might pass for local.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 2301 GMT (0701 HKT)
History buff? Hardcore surfer? These South Pacific islands have every traveler covered.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 1514 GMT (2314 HKT)
Airlines and airports are going high-tech to reduce your time in line.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 0858 GMT (1658 HKT)
Summer isn't over yet. These new hotels are keeping it alive and fresh.
August 19, 2014 -- Updated 1832 GMT (0232 HKT)
Eight of the top 10 scoring cities in the Economic Intelligence Unit's annual Liveability Survey are in Australia and Canada.
August 18, 2014 -- Updated 2221 GMT (0621 HKT)
When a man tells me to "trust him," my typical reaction is to run.
ADVERTISEMENT