Skip to main content

Same-sex marriages start in New Jersey, 14th state to recognize such unions

By Ed Payne, CNN
October 21, 2013 -- Updated 1513 GMT (2313 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Newark mayor conducts marriages of several same-sex couples
  • A court denied the state's request to temporarily prevent such marriages last week
  • New Jersey has allowed same-sex civil unions since 2007

(CNN) -- Marsha Shapiro and Louise Walpin married each other for the third time early Monday. But this time, it was especially memorable: They were among the first to tie the knot after same-sex marriage became legal in New Jersey.

A rabbi first "married" the couple in 1992 in a Jewish ceremony. They married a second time in New York in August 2012 after same-sex marriage became legal there.

The third time was just after midnight Thursday in the Garden State. The couple helped pave the way there through a 2011 lawsuit that brought about the change. New Jersey now becomes the 14th state to recognize gay marriages.

Shapiro and Walpin were married in the home of state Sen. Raymond Lesniak, who championed same-sex marriage in the legislature.

Andrea Taylor, left, and Sallee Taylor kiss during their wedding in West Hollywood, California, on Monday, July 1, as Sallee Taylor's daughter Grace Meier, right, looks on. The city of West Hollywood offered civil marriage ceremonies for same-sex couples free of charge Monday. Andrea Taylor, left, and Sallee Taylor kiss during their wedding in West Hollywood, California, on Monday, July 1, as Sallee Taylor's daughter Grace Meier, right, looks on. The city of West Hollywood offered civil marriage ceremonies for same-sex couples free of charge Monday.
Same-sex weddings after Supreme Court rulings
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
>
>>
Same-sex weddings after rulings Same-sex weddings after rulings
Julia Tate, left, kisses her wife, Lisa McMillin, in Nashville, Tennessee, after the reading the results of the Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage on Wednesday, June 26. The high court struck down key parts of the Defense of Marriage Act and cleared the way for same-sex marriages to resume in California by rejecting an appeal on the state's Proposition 8. Julia Tate, left, kisses her wife, Lisa McMillin, in Nashville, Tennessee, after the reading the results of the Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage on Wednesday, June 26. The high court struck down key parts of the Defense of Marriage Act and cleared the way for same-sex marriages to resume in California by rejecting an appeal on the state's Proposition 8.
Reaction to same-sex marriage rulings
HIDE CAPTION
<<
<
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
>
>>
Photos: Reaction to same-sex marriage rulings Photos: Reaction to same-sex marriage rulings
Christie withdraws appeal on gay marriage
Obama: Gay marriage 'should be legal'

Throughout the state other gay couples exchanged vows in early morning ceremonies.

At the Newark City Hall, Mayor Cory Booker married seven couples, two of them heterosexual. He had refused to conduct any marriage ceremonies until same-sex marriages were legal in the state.

"It is officially past midnight," Booker said. "Marriage is equal in New Jersey."

Chris Christie drops challenge to same-sex marriages

High court clears the way

On Friday, the New Jersey Supreme Court denied the state's request to temporarily prevent such marriages.

Troy Stevenson, executive director of the gay rights group Garden State Equality, said last week that the high court's decision means "the door is open for love, commitment and equality under the law."

"This is a huge victory for New Jersey's same-sex couples and their families," added Hayley Gorenberg, deputy legal director of gay rights group Lambda Legal and the organization's lead attorney on the case. "Take out the champagne glasses -- wedding bells will soon be ringing in New Jersey!"

That enthusiasm was not shared by everyone.

"It is extremely disappointing that the New Jersey Supreme Court has allowed the ruling of an activist judge to stand pending its appeal through the court system," said Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, last week. "All in all, today's ruling is another sad chapter in watching our courts usurp the rights of voters to determine issues like this for themselves."

Gov. Chris Christie's administration appealed, and asked the court to delay, a lower court's September 27 order that the state must allow same-sex couples to marry beginning October 21, rather than give them the label "civil union."

The appeal will be heard in January. But the state Supreme Court on Friday declined to delay the September order in the meantime, writing that "the state has not shown a reasonable probability that it will succeed on the merits" of the appeal.

"When a party presents a clear case of ongoing unequal treatment, and asks the court to vindicate constitutionally protected rights, a court may not sidestep its obligation to rule for an indefinite amount of time," the 20-page decision read. "Under those circumstances, courts do not have the option to defer."

Where sex-same marriage is legal

New Jersey has recognized civil unions between same-sex couples since 2007, after the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the state must allow same-sex couples all the rights and benefits of marriage. As far as state rights and benefits went, civil unions and marriages differed only in label.

Three states offer civil unions, but not marriage, to same-sex couples. They are Colorado, Hawaii and Illinois.

Same-sex marriage is now legal in 14 U.S states -- California, Connecticut, Delaware, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington -- as well as the District of Columbia.

Same-sex marriage is banned in every state not mentioned above, except for New Mexico, which has no laws banning or allowing it.

CNN's Jason Hanna and Kevin Wang contributed to this report.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
Same-sex marriage debate
October 21, 2014 -- Updated 2235 GMT (0635 HKT)
Same-sex marriage is spreading quickly in the U.S., even reaching several "red" states. Activists have also launched a new push in the Deep South.
October 7, 2014 -- Updated 1725 GMT (0125 HKT)
Never has the Supreme Court said so much when saying so little.
Find out which states match your values when it comes to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights.
November 24, 2014 -- Updated 2040 GMT (0440 HKT)
Here's a look at what you need to know about same-sex marriage in the U.S. and worldwide.
October 7, 2014 -- Updated 0222 GMT (1022 HKT)
Here's a look at same-sex marriage in the United States, by the numbers.
Which states allow same-sex marriage, and which states don't?
November 16, 2014 -- Updated 1615 GMT (0015 HKT)
Evangelical leaders are taking a step back from their decades-long fight against gay marriage, softening their tone and recalibrating their goals.
June 30, 2014 -- Updated 2348 GMT (0748 HKT)
In the same-sex marriage debate, Elton John believes he knows where Jesus would've stood.
June 26, 2014 -- Updated 1159 GMT (1959 HKT)
A year ago, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key section of the Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA.
June 28, 2014 -- Updated 1226 GMT (2026 HKT)
Anthony Sullivan was a young Australian with Robert Redford looks. Richard Adams emigrated from the Philippines as a child and became an American citizen.
June 25, 2014 -- Updated 1931 GMT (0331 HKT)
The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) voted to allow pastors to marry same-sex couples in states where it is legal.
ADVERTISEMENT