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Golfer hits hole in one but joy short lived

Stuart Manley thought he won this car after hitting a hole in one but he was a round too early.

Story highlights

  • Welsh golfer Stuart Manley hits a hole in one at the World Cup of Golf in Melbourne
  • Manley celebrates wildly as he thinks he has won a new Mercedes
  • But the car only goes to those who hit a hole in one in the fourth and final round
  • A disappointed Manley then hits an 11 on the par-4 fourth and finishes with a 72

Talk about going from ecstasy to agony.

Welsh golfer Stuart Manley thought he won a new Mercedes when he struck a hole in one at the World Cup of Golf in Melbourne.

The world No. 346 celebrated wildly and even patted the car -- which was on display.

But then Manley was told the car only went to those who hit a hole in one in the fourth and final round and he slumped to an 11 on his ensuing hole, the fourth.

"It's the highest high and then the lowest low I've ever experienced on a golf course," Manley told the tournament website. "I thought the car was mine, and with the crowd, all the hype, I was just buzzing. The adrenaline was pumping so much.

"Then I found out about the car and go and have an 11.

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    "I kept asking my caddie, 'How many shots is that now?' I actually thought it was a 10 but I was not going to argue, because my head was pretty fried at that point."

    Despite the disastrous fourth, Manley managed to finish the round at one-over 72 and stands at two under, total, entering play Sunday.

    "If somebody had told me I would've finished on two under at the end of the day after taking an 11, I would have taken it," he said. "I didn't know whether to laugh or cry at that point, but you've just got to pick yourself up and get on with it.

    "I won't forget this day for a while."

    Jason Day -- who lost eight of his relatives in the deadly typhoon in the Philippines this month -- led on home soil, one shot better than Denmark's Thomas Bjorn. Manley was tied for eighth, seven shots adrift.

    Read: Golf community rallies around Day

    Australia also leads the team standings, with the U.S. one shot behind.