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Teen sensation Lydia Ko signs with IMG agency

December 13, 2013 -- Updated 1210 GMT (2010 HKT)
New Zealander Lydia Ko was born in the South Korean city of Seoul.
New Zealander Lydia Ko was born in the South Korean city of Seoul.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Teenage golf sensation Lydia Ko signs with sports management firm IMG
  • Ko is the youngest winner in LPGA Tour history
  • The South-Korean born New Zealander has racked up five pro wins already
  • The 16-year-old will join the LPGA Tour in 2014

(CNN) -- She's the youngest winner in LPGA Tour history and now teen sensation Lydia Ko looks set for a long and lucrative career after teaming up with a major sports management firm.

The South-Korean born New Zealander has signed with IMG, the company which once had world No. 1 Tiger Woods on its books.

"Now officially an IMG family member :)," the 16-year-old announced on Twitter.

Ko has enjoyed five professional wins since January 2012 and is ranked No. 4 in the world.

In August 2012, two days after her 15th birthday, Ko won the Canadian Women's Open but was unable to collect the $300,000 winner's check due to her status as an amateur.

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It was the same story when she defended the title 12 months on, with Ko neglecting to turn pro to focus on her education.

She also benefited from the backing of wealthy benefactor David Levene, who donated some of his fortune to Ko so she could remain an amateur and continue with her studies.

Ko will have no such problems in the future as she joins the LPGA Tour in 2014.

"I am excited to work with my new team at IMG as I embark on my professional career," Ko said in a statement.

"My family and I spoke with many candidates and IMG emerged as the clear choice to represent me, in large part because of their global reach. I am comfortable knowing that IMG will commit the appropriate resources to help my career excel while I focus on golf."

Ko was described by IMG's global head of golf Guy Kinnings as "an incredibly impressive young lady and an astonishing player."

IMG's female golf stable already includes illustrious names such as 2010 U.S. Women's Open winner Paula Creamer and American Michelle Wie.

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