Skip to main content

Spain's recovery: Can short-term, low-paid labor help?

By Al Goodman, CNN
December 17, 2013 -- Updated 1706 GMT (0106 HKT)
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • CNN met Valentin Garcia in 2012, when he was unemployed, now he has a job
  • But the job is short term and at 50, he's only earning the minimum wage
  • This represents many jobs that are being created in Spain -- short-term and badly paid
  • Questions are being raised over how much these can help the country's long-term recovery

(CNN) -- The recent email in my in-box was simply titled "Trabajo," which in Spanish means "work" or "a job."

It was from Valentin Garcia - a jobless man we met in 2012 telling us, rather excitedly, that he'd gotten a job, at last. No small feat in Spain's economic crisis.

He'd been out of work for more than three years before getting hired as a tree trimmer on a city work crew.

We met Garcia, who's done all sorts of manual jobs, in June 2012 at a Red Cross food bank where he came to get a handout. He'd lost his job as a waiter two years earlier.

Madrid trash strike piles on

There was a line at the Red Cross site in the Madrid suburb of Tres Cantos, and the down-on-their-luck Spaniards and immigrants waiting there didn't want to talk to CNN about their plight.

Spain's brain drain problem

Garcia also initially declined. He was concerned about how it would look on TV but eventually he told us that a TV interview might help him be seen by potential employers.

Read more: Thousands protests law in Spain

Spain's brick factories' 'tough' future

We said we could only tell his story, but not guarantee he'd get a job. He agreed to talk.

"If there is just part-time work, fine, at any hour, any job, even if I have to learn it from scratch," Garcia told us then.

And then described the difficulties for a single man -- he was then 48 -- in Spain's crisis. His jobless benefits had run out, he had almost no savings, and he said he was really getting by thanks to help from his elderly mother.

In October 2012, we covered the Spanish Red Cross's annual fundraiser that dates back more than a century and whose proceeds usually go to help people in disaster zones abroad. But for the first time, the money was being used to ease suffering at home, in Spain.

We checked in with Garcia again. He still had no job, and was not very optimistic.

Then came the joyous email about his new job. We went to update our story on him and found out there's some good news and some bad news.

Yes, he's working, but only for six months. At 50, he's learning all about tree trimming, earning minimum wage -- about $900 a month.

Watch more: Can Spain wine ease country's pain?

"It's a bit boring," Garcia said during a break. "But it's what there is. Since they've given you an opportunity, at least you're busy."

The Spanish government says the nation has been busy trying to get out of the economic crisis, and Spain's unemployment rate is finally starting to decline, although it's still 26% with 5.9 million people jobless.

Can wine solve Spain's financial crisis?

Unions, citing government figures that the Ministry of Labor confirms, say about 1.2 million jobs are being created in Spain each month, but that most of them are part time and temporary. And a third of them last less than four hours a day.

Irish economy welcomes farming rebirth

Garcia works five hours. He'd like to get more work but thinks his chances are slim because, he says, most companies aren't hiring older workers. He says he's too old to learn languages and move abroad, as many college-educated Spaniards, and even some without a degree, are doing, in search of work.

'Politics going down a blind alley'

The mayor of Tres Cantos, the prosperous suburb that employs Garcia, is from Spain's ruling conservative party, which has been touting the economic recovery -- including the temporary jobs.

"No, they're not the solution to Spain's problem of more than five million people unemployed," said Mayor Jesus Moreno. "But they're important so the long-term jobless can get training.

Watch more: Making Spain more business friendly

Garcia, sitting on a bench and eating a sandwich, told us, "I'd like to change places with the politicians for a month or two so they could see what it's like to suffer in the economic crisis."

But his most immediate concern is paying the bills when this job ends in April. He says he'll have to ask his elderly mother for help, again.

We may need to check in again in the future with Valentin Garcia.

ADVERTISEMENT
Part of complete coverage on
October 23, 2014 -- Updated 1756 GMT (0156 HKT)
Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, shot while standing guard at Ottawa's National War Memorial, was known for his easygoing manner and smile.
October 22, 2014 -- Updated 2006 GMT (0406 HKT)
Non-stop chatter about actress' appearance is nasty, cruel, hurtful, invasive and sexist.
October 22, 2014 -- Updated 2058 GMT (0458 HKT)
Air New Zealand's new 'Hobbit' safety video stars Peter Jackson, Elijah Wood, elves and orcs.
October 23, 2014 -- Updated 1414 GMT (2214 HKT)
A 15-year-old pregnant girl is rescued from slavery, only to be charged with having sex outside of marriage, shocked rights activists say -- a charge potentially punishable by death.
October 22, 2014 -- Updated 0333 GMT (1133 HKT)
After sushi and ramen, beef is on the list of must-eats for many visitors to Japan.
October 20, 2014 -- Updated 1607 GMT (0007 HKT)
Airports judged on comfort, conveniences, cleanliness and customer service.
October 22, 2014 -- Updated 1748 GMT (0148 HKT)
Scientists use CT scans to recreate a life-size image of the ancient king.
October 22, 2014 -- Updated 0959 GMT (1759 HKT)
Despite billions spent on eradicating poppy production, Afghan farmers are growing bumper crops, a U.S. government report says.
October 20, 2014 -- Updated 1319 GMT (2119 HKT)
With so many new attractions on the way, the next few years are going to be a roller coaster ride.
October 16, 2014 -- Updated 0429 GMT (1229 HKT)
Thomas Malthus famously predicted that rising populations would create a food crunch: Could this be true?
October 18, 2014 -- Updated 1033 GMT (1833 HKT)
From "Sick Man of Europe" to the world's fourth largest economy.
October 23, 2014 -- Updated 1153 GMT (1953 HKT)
Each day, CNN brings you an image capturing a moment to remember, defining the present in our changing world.
Browse through images from CNN teams around the world that you don't always see on news reports.
ADVERTISEMENT