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Alex Rodriguez drops lawsuits, accepts 162-game suspension

By Ray Sanchez, CNN
February 9, 2014 -- Updated 1645 GMT (0045 HKT)
New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez, who received a 162-game doping suspension, Friday withdrew his lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the players' union.
New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez, who received a 162-game doping suspension, Friday withdrew his lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the players' union.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Alex Rodriguez withdraws federal lawsuits seeking to overturn doping suspension
  • Notices of dismissal were filed Friday
  • The Yankees slugger received a record 162-game suspension for alleged steroid use

New York (CNN) -- New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez, who received a 162-game doping suspension, Friday withdrew his lawsuits against Major League Baseball, Commissioner Bud Selig and the players' union.

In the lawsuits, Rodriguez had sought to get a Manhattan federal court to throw out the record-setting penalty.

Notices of dismissal in the lawsuits were filed Friday in Manhattan, meaning the player will accept the suspension and sit out the 2014 season.

There was no immediate comment from Rodriguez's attorneys or his spokesman, Ron Berkowitz.

In a statement, Major League Baseball said: "We have been informed that Alex Rodriguez has reached the prudent decision to end all of the litigation related to the Biogenesis matter. We believe that Mr. Rodriguez's actions show his desire to return the focus to the play of our great game on the field and to all of the positive attributes and actions of his fellow Major League Players. We share that desire."

The Major League Baseball Players Association said in a statement: "Alex Rodriguez has done the right thing by withdrawing his lawsuit. His decision to move forward is in everyone's best interest."

In one of the lawsuits, filed in October, Rodriguez had alleged that MLB and Selig "engaged in tortious and egregious conduct with one and only one goal ... to destroy the reputation and career of Alex Rodriguez."

The lawsuit had claimed that in its investigation of Anthony Bosch and his Biogenesis anti-aging clinic in Miami, MLB engaged in vigilante justice to prove that Rodriguez was using performance enhancing drugs.

Rodriguez has said that the investigation, which was supposed to stay private, has permanently harmed his reputation and ensured that he will never again secure any endorsement contracts.

Did Rodriguez expose doping secrets?

The lawsuit included had claimed that MLB went around collective bargain agreements to make an example of Rodriguez and to "gloss over Selig's past inaction and tacit approval of the use of performance enhancing substances in baseball and to secure his legacy as the savior of America's pastime."

Major League Baseball arbitrator Fredric Horowitz last month upheld most of Rodriguez's 211-game doping suspension, keeping him out of the 2014 regular season and the postseason. It was the most severe punishment in baseball history for doping and a highlight of baseball Commissioner Bud Selig's recent high-profile crackdown on performance-enhancing drugs.

The suspension will not only cost Rodriguez $25 million in salary, but it also further clouds the groundbreaking career of a player who'll turn 40 in the 2015 season.

Rodriguez, one of 14 players suspended in the Biogenesis scandal, was the only one who appealed his suspension. Though he was suspended in August, Rodriguez played out the 2013 season because of the appeal.

CNN's Adam Reiss contributed to this report.

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